Cardiac catheterisation and the promotion of positive self-coping and management

Cara Roberts-Collins, Catriona Anderson, Jackie MacCallum, Catherine Randle-Phillips, Andrew Medley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background:
Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a chronic condition, which is diagnosed and monitored using cardiac catheterisation (CATH). This procedure can be anxiety-provoking; however, most patients undergo CATH without any formal psychological support.

Aims:
This study aimed to better understand the psychological impact of the CATH, positive coping and self-management skills, from patients' and professionals' perspectives.

Method:
Ten patients and ten staff members at a hospital in the South West of England were interviewed.

Results:
Thematic analysis resulted in complimentary patient and professional themes. These included: the importance of recognising individual differences, the patient–staff relationship, and the practical and emotional journey of the CATH. Findings suggest that factors which enhance a patient's understanding and sense of control were associated with positive coping.

Conclusion:
Recommendations with important implications for increasing patient control and choice, and promoting positive coping for patients, were made to the service.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)342-351
JournalBritish Journal of Cardiac Nursing
Volume12
Issue number7
Early online date10 Jul 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Nov 2017

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