Carbon dioxide conversion to hydrocarbons using structured carbon nanotube supports

Daniel Minett, Justin O'Byrne, Matthew Jones, Davide Mattia, Pawel Plucinski

Research output: Contribution to conferencePoster

Abstract

Dealing with carbon dioxide waste is an ongoing societal and technological challenge. One attractive proposition is to chemically convert waste carbon dioxide into useful chemical products. One possible route is to combine two well-known chemical processes, reverse water gas shift and Fischer-Tropsch synthesis, to make a catalyst capable of converting carbon dioxide directly into hydrocarbons.

Iron nanoparticles supported on carbon nanofibres have shown promise in the Fischer-Tropsch process.1 We have shown that iron nanoparticles supported on carbon nanotubes (Fe@CNT) are also effective catalysts for the coupled reverse water gas shift and Fischer-Tropsch reactions.2 Using an oxidation process the iron nanoparticles embedded in the carbon nanotubes from the synthesis process can be regenerated to act as catalysts for the Fischer-Tropsch reaction (see figure 1a).2

Carbon nanotube powders generated in this way are difficult to handle, and could be difficult to scale-up. We have, therefore, developed a method to grow long, aligned carbon nanotubes on a commercial cordierite monolith support (see figure 1b. 3 Using the same oxidation method we have now activated these Fe@CNTs-monoliths to act as catalysts for carbon dioxide conversion. Here we report on the first promising results.

Conference

ConferenceSuBiCat 1: Symposium on sustainable catalytic conversions of renewable substrates
CountryUK United Kingdom
CitySt Andrews
Period24/03/1226/03/13

Fingerprint

Carbon Nanotubes
Hydrocarbons
Carbon Dioxide
Catalysts
Water gas shift
Iron
Nanoparticles
Oxidation
Fischer-Tropsch synthesis
Carbon nanofibers
Powders

Cite this

Minett, D., O'Byrne, J., Jones, M., Mattia, D., & Plucinski, P. (2013). Carbon dioxide conversion to hydrocarbons using structured carbon nanotube supports. Poster session presented at SuBiCat 1: Symposium on sustainable catalytic conversions of renewable substrates, St Andrews, UK United Kingdom.

Carbon dioxide conversion to hydrocarbons using structured carbon nanotube supports. / Minett, Daniel; O'Byrne, Justin; Jones, Matthew; Mattia, Davide; Plucinski, Pawel.

2013. Poster session presented at SuBiCat 1: Symposium on sustainable catalytic conversions of renewable substrates, St Andrews, UK United Kingdom.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePoster

Minett, D, O'Byrne, J, Jones, M, Mattia, D & Plucinski, P 2013, 'Carbon dioxide conversion to hydrocarbons using structured carbon nanotube supports' SuBiCat 1: Symposium on sustainable catalytic conversions of renewable substrates, St Andrews, UK United Kingdom, 24/03/12 - 26/03/13, .
Minett D, O'Byrne J, Jones M, Mattia D, Plucinski P. Carbon dioxide conversion to hydrocarbons using structured carbon nanotube supports. 2013. Poster session presented at SuBiCat 1: Symposium on sustainable catalytic conversions of renewable substrates, St Andrews, UK United Kingdom.
Minett, Daniel ; O'Byrne, Justin ; Jones, Matthew ; Mattia, Davide ; Plucinski, Pawel. / Carbon dioxide conversion to hydrocarbons using structured carbon nanotube supports. Poster session presented at SuBiCat 1: Symposium on sustainable catalytic conversions of renewable substrates, St Andrews, UK United Kingdom.
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AB - Dealing with carbon dioxide waste is an ongoing societal and technological challenge. One attractive proposition is to chemically convert waste carbon dioxide into useful chemical products. One possible route is to combine two well-known chemical processes, reverse water gas shift and Fischer-Tropsch synthesis, to make a catalyst capable of converting carbon dioxide directly into hydrocarbons. Iron nanoparticles supported on carbon nanofibres have shown promise in the Fischer-Tropsch process.1 We have shown that iron nanoparticles supported on carbon nanotubes (Fe@CNT) are also effective catalysts for the coupled reverse water gas shift and Fischer-Tropsch reactions.2 Using an oxidation process the iron nanoparticles embedded in the carbon nanotubes from the synthesis process can be regenerated to act as catalysts for the Fischer-Tropsch reaction (see figure 1a).2 Carbon nanotube powders generated in this way are difficult to handle, and could be difficult to scale-up. We have, therefore, developed a method to grow long, aligned carbon nanotubes on a commercial cordierite monolith support (see figure 1b. 3 Using the same oxidation method we have now activated these Fe@CNTs-monoliths to act as catalysts for carbon dioxide conversion. Here we report on the first promising results.

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