Can abortion rights be integrated into the Women, Peace and Security Agenda?

Jennifer Thomson, Claire Pierson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)
7 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Reproductive rights are an under-theorised aspect of the Women, Peace and Security (WPS) agenda, most clearly typified in United Nations Security Council resolution (UNSCR) 1325 and successive resolutions. Yet reproductive rights are central to women’s security, health and human rights. Although they feature in the 2015 Global Study on 1325, there is less reference to reproductive rights, and to abortion specifically, in the suite of United Nations Security Council (UNSC) resolutions themselves, nor in the National Action Plans (NAPs, policy documents created by individual countries to outline their implementation plans for 1325). Through content analysis of all resolutions and NAPs produced to date, this article asks where abortion is in the WPS agenda. It argues that the growing centrality of the WPS agenda to women’s rights in transitioning societies means that a lack of focus on abortion will marginalize the topic and stifle the development of liberal legalization.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)350-365
Number of pages16
JournalInternational Feminist Journal of Politics
Volume20
Issue number3
Early online date15 Feb 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 3 Jul 2018

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abortion
peace
UNO
legalization
women's rights
action plan
Agenda
Peace
Abortion
content analysis
human rights
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health
society
Reproductive Rights
United Nations

Keywords

  • Abortion
  • CEDAW
  • UNSCR 1325
  • WPS agenda
  • reproductive rights

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gender Studies
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Political Science and International Relations

Cite this

Can abortion rights be integrated into the Women, Peace and Security Agenda? / Thomson, Jennifer; Pierson, Claire.

In: International Feminist Journal of Politics, Vol. 20, No. 3, 03.07.2018, p. 350-365.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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