Brief Report: Schema consistent misinformation effects in eyewitnesses with autism spectrum disorder

Katie Maras, Dermot M Bowler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  • 10 Citations

Abstract

A number of studies have demonstrated schema-related misinformation effects in typical individuals, but no research to date has examined this with witnesses
with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), despite their impaired ability to generate core elements that define everyday events. After witnessing slides depicting a bank robbery, 16 adults with ASD and 16 matched comparison individuals were exposed to post-event misinformation that was either schema typical or atypical. Consistent with previous work, the comparison group went onto report more schema typical misinformation than atypical misinformation. However, so too did the ASD group, suggesting that individuals with ASD do have understanding of the causal links between events, persons and actions, an important finding from both theoretical and applied perspectives.
LanguageEnglish
Pages815-820
JournalJournal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
Volume41
Issue number6
DOIs
StatusPublished - Jun 2011

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Communication
Aptitude
Autism Spectrum Disorder
Research

Keywords

  • autism spectrum disorder
  • schema
  • typicality
  • misinformation
  • eyewitness
  • memory

Cite this

Brief Report: Schema consistent misinformation effects in eyewitnesses with autism spectrum disorder. / Maras, Katie; Bowler, Dermot M.

In: Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, Vol. 41, No. 6, 06.2011, p. 815-820.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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