11 Citations (Scopus)
101 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

The provision of the extraordinarily deadly product of cigarettes is dominated by a small number of large and incredibly profitable shareholder owned companies that are focussed on cigarettes. The legal duty of their managers to maximise shareholder wealth means that such companies vigorously fight any new public health measures that have the potential to disrupt their massive profit making, and have the resources to do so. Protecting the public health is therefore made a lot more difficult and expensive. We suggest that one way to counter this would be to actively design future tobacco control policies so that tobacco companies face mechanisms and incentives to develop in such a way that they no longer achieve the greatest shareholder value by focusing on cigarettes. A proper tobacco diversification and exit strategy for the shareholders of the profit-seeking tobacco industry would protect the public health by addressing the current addiction to the continuation of the cigarette market. The increasing popularity of e-cigarettes presents a particular opportunity in this regard, and we therefore suggest a possible policy response in order to start discussion in this area.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)14-18
JournalInternational Journal of Drug Policy
Volume29
Early online date29 Dec 2015
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2016

Fingerprint

Tobacco Products
Tobacco
Smoking
Public Health
Tobacco Industry
Motivation

Keywords

  • Sustainability
  • E-cigarettes
  • Incentives
  • Regulation
  • Industry Structure
  • Tobacco Endgame
  • Tobacco Industry

Cite this

Big tobacco, e-cigarettes, and a road to the smoking endgame. / Branston, J Robert; Sweanor, David.

In: International Journal of Drug Policy, Vol. 29, 03.2016, p. 14-18.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{977376bac86f460388cf6a2140ee79ef,
title = "Big tobacco, e-cigarettes, and a road to the smoking endgame",
abstract = "The provision of the extraordinarily deadly product of cigarettes is dominated by a small number of large and incredibly profitable shareholder owned companies that are focussed on cigarettes. The legal duty of their managers to maximise shareholder wealth means that such companies vigorously fight any new public health measures that have the potential to disrupt their massive profit making, and have the resources to do so. Protecting the public health is therefore made a lot more difficult and expensive. We suggest that one way to counter this would be to actively design future tobacco control policies so that tobacco companies face mechanisms and incentives to develop in such a way that they no longer achieve the greatest shareholder value by focusing on cigarettes. A proper tobacco diversification and exit strategy for the shareholders of the profit-seeking tobacco industry would protect the public health by addressing the current addiction to the continuation of the cigarette market. The increasing popularity of e-cigarettes presents a particular opportunity in this regard, and we therefore suggest a possible policy response in order to start discussion in this area.",
keywords = "Sustainability, E-cigarettes, Incentives, Regulation, Industry Structure, Tobacco Endgame, Tobacco Industry",
author = "Branston, {J Robert} and David Sweanor",
year = "2016",
month = "3",
doi = "10.1016/j.drugpo.2015.12.023",
language = "English",
volume = "29",
pages = "14--18",
journal = "International Journal of Drug Policy",
issn = "0955-3959",
publisher = "Elsevier",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Big tobacco, e-cigarettes, and a road to the smoking endgame

AU - Branston, J Robert

AU - Sweanor, David

PY - 2016/3

Y1 - 2016/3

N2 - The provision of the extraordinarily deadly product of cigarettes is dominated by a small number of large and incredibly profitable shareholder owned companies that are focussed on cigarettes. The legal duty of their managers to maximise shareholder wealth means that such companies vigorously fight any new public health measures that have the potential to disrupt their massive profit making, and have the resources to do so. Protecting the public health is therefore made a lot more difficult and expensive. We suggest that one way to counter this would be to actively design future tobacco control policies so that tobacco companies face mechanisms and incentives to develop in such a way that they no longer achieve the greatest shareholder value by focusing on cigarettes. A proper tobacco diversification and exit strategy for the shareholders of the profit-seeking tobacco industry would protect the public health by addressing the current addiction to the continuation of the cigarette market. The increasing popularity of e-cigarettes presents a particular opportunity in this regard, and we therefore suggest a possible policy response in order to start discussion in this area.

AB - The provision of the extraordinarily deadly product of cigarettes is dominated by a small number of large and incredibly profitable shareholder owned companies that are focussed on cigarettes. The legal duty of their managers to maximise shareholder wealth means that such companies vigorously fight any new public health measures that have the potential to disrupt their massive profit making, and have the resources to do so. Protecting the public health is therefore made a lot more difficult and expensive. We suggest that one way to counter this would be to actively design future tobacco control policies so that tobacco companies face mechanisms and incentives to develop in such a way that they no longer achieve the greatest shareholder value by focusing on cigarettes. A proper tobacco diversification and exit strategy for the shareholders of the profit-seeking tobacco industry would protect the public health by addressing the current addiction to the continuation of the cigarette market. The increasing popularity of e-cigarettes presents a particular opportunity in this regard, and we therefore suggest a possible policy response in order to start discussion in this area.

KW - Sustainability

KW - E-cigarettes

KW - Incentives

KW - Regulation

KW - Industry Structure

KW - Tobacco Endgame

KW - Tobacco Industry

UR - http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.drugpo.2015.12.023

U2 - 10.1016/j.drugpo.2015.12.023

DO - 10.1016/j.drugpo.2015.12.023

M3 - Article

VL - 29

SP - 14

EP - 18

JO - International Journal of Drug Policy

JF - International Journal of Drug Policy

SN - 0955-3959

ER -