Biceps femoris long head muscle fascicle length does not differ between sexes

Fearghal Behan, Rachael Moody, Tejal Sarika Patel, Edward Lattimore, Tom Maden-Wilkinson, Thomas Balshaw

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Hamstring strain injury (HSI) rates are higher for males vs. females. This cross-sectional study investigated if inherent differences in biceps femoris long head (BFLH) fascicle length (Lf) exist between recreationally active males and females (i.e., individuals without specific training practice history). Twenty-four young healthy participants (12 males; 12 females) had their BFLH muscle architecture (Lf, pennation angle [θp], and muscle thickness [MT]) measured using B-mode ultrasonography. Eccentric and isometric knee flexion strength were also assessed. BFLH Lf did not differ between sexes when expressed in absolute terms (males, 81.5 ± 14.7 mm; females, 73.6 ± 15.9 mm, P = 0.220, effect size (ES) = 0.52) or relative to femur length (0.140 ≤ P ≤ 0.220, ES = 0.63). Similarly, BFLH θp did not differ between sexes (P = 0.650) but BFLH MT was 18.9% larger for males vs. females (P = 0.024, ES = 0.99). Isometric and eccentric knee flexion strength was greater for males vs. females in absolute terms ([both] P < 0.001, 2.00 ≤ ES ≤ 2.27) and relative to body mass ([both] P < 0.001, 1.93 ≤ ES ≤ 2.13). In conclusion, factors other than BFLH Lf seem likely to be implicated in higher male vs. female HSI rates.
Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Sports Sciences
Early online date14 Jul 2019
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 14 Jul 2019

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Biceps femoris long head muscle fascicle length does not differ between sexes'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this