Beyond subjective well-being: a critical review of the Stiglitz Report approach to subjective perspectives on quality of life

Sarah C. White, Stanley O. Gaines, Shreya Jha

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper welcomes the Stiglitz Report's placing of wellbeing at the centre of policy discussions of measuring economic performance and social progress. However, the paper critiques the identification of subjective perspectives on quality of life solely with subjective well-being. The paper locates subjective well-being within psychological wellbeing, happiness and quality of life studies more broadly. It argues for attention to concepts, not just techniques, and more engagement with social and political perspectives. It draws on empirical research in Zambia and India to show that context matters and qualitative research is needed to complement quantitative measures of wellbeing.
LanguageEnglish
Pages763-776
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of International Development
Volume24
Issue number6
Early online date16 Jul 2012
DOIs
StatusPublished - Aug 2012

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quality of life
well-being
Zambia
happiness
qualitative research
empirical research
India
economics
performance
measuring
policy

Cite this

Beyond subjective well-being: a critical review of the Stiglitz Report approach to subjective perspectives on quality of life. / White, Sarah C.; Gaines, Stanley O.; Jha, Shreya.

In: Journal of International Development, Vol. 24, No. 6, 08.2012, p. 763-776.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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