Being dead and being there: research interviews, sharing hand cream and the preference for analysing 'naturally occurring data'

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Abstract

Qualitative research in psychology has tended to draw on a relatively narrow range of research methods, and the recent shift towards In the analysis of material involving 'naturally occurring talk' in some areas of psychology has reinforced this trend. This article discusses the implications of a preference for the analysis of 'naturally occurring talk' or 'naturalistic records' across the full range of qualitative psychology research. In particular, I focus on how researchers are positioned in debates over the advantages and limitations of analysing 'naturally occurring data' and research interviews. Drawing on examples from a current project concerned with the meanings of consumption for young people, I interrogate the assumptions associated with a preference for analysing 'naturalistic records' and consider some of the benefits as well as the problems involved in using research practices that involve a degree of direct engagement between the researcher and other participants. This article is therefore discussing the origins as well as the implications of the preference for analysing 'naturally occurring.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)246-269
Number of pages24
JournalDiscourse Studies
Volume9
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2007

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