Behavioural tasks sensitive to acute abstinence and predictive of smoking cessation success: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Meryem Grabski, H Valerie Curran, David J Nutt, Stephen M Husbands, Tom P Freeman, Meg Fluharty, Marcus R Munafò

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Performance on cognitive tasks may be sensitive to acute smoking abstinence and may also predict whether quit attempts fail. Our aim was to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis to identify cognitive tasks sensitive to acute abstinence and predictive of smoking cessation success.

METHODS: Embase, Medline, PsycInfo and Web of Science were searched up to March 2016. Studies were included if they enrolled adults and assessed smoking using a quantitative measure. Studies were combined in a random effects meta-analysis.

RESULTS: We included 42 acute abstinence studies and 13 cessation studies. There was evidence for an effect of abstinence on delay discounting [d = 0.26, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.07-0.45, P = 0.005], response inhibition (d = 0.48, 95% CI = 0.26-0.70, P < 0.001), mental arithmetic (d = 0.38, 95% CI = 0.06-0.70, P = 0.018), and recognition memory (d = 0.46, 95% CI = 0.23-0.70, P < 0.001). In contrast, performance on the Stroop (d = 0 .17, 95% CI = -0.17-0.51, P = 0.333) and smoking Stroop (d = 0.03, 95% CI = -0.11-0.17, P = 0.675) task was not influenced by abstinence. We found only weak evidence for an effect of acute abstinence on dot probe task performance (d = 0.15, 95% CI = -0.01-0.32, P = 0.072). The design of the cessation studies was too heterogeneous to permit meta-analysis.

CONCLUSIONS: Compared with satiated smokers, acutely abstinent smokers display higher delay discounting, lower response inhibition, impaired arithmetic and recognition memory performance. However, reaction-time measures of cognitive bias appear to be unaffected by acute tobacco abstinence. Conclusions about cognitive tasks that predict smoking cessation success were limited by methodological inconsistencies.

LanguageEnglish
Pages2134-2144
Number of pages11
JournalAddiction
Volume111
Issue number12
Early online date24 Jun 2016
DOIs
StatusPublished - Dec 2016

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Smoking Cessation
Meta-Analysis
Confidence Intervals
Smoking
Task Performance and Analysis
Reaction Time
Tobacco

Keywords

  • Adult
  • Cognitive Therapy/methods
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Psychomotor Performance/physiology
  • Recurrence
  • Sample Size
  • Smoking Cessation/methods
  • Treatment Outcome

Cite this

Behavioural tasks sensitive to acute abstinence and predictive of smoking cessation success : a systematic review and meta-analysis. / Grabski, Meryem; Curran, H Valerie; Nutt, David J; Husbands, Stephen M; Freeman, Tom P; Fluharty, Meg; Munafò, Marcus R.

In: Addiction, Vol. 111, No. 12, 12.2016, p. 2134-2144.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Grabski, Meryem ; Curran, H Valerie ; Nutt, David J ; Husbands, Stephen M ; Freeman, Tom P ; Fluharty, Meg ; Munafò, Marcus R. / Behavioural tasks sensitive to acute abstinence and predictive of smoking cessation success : a systematic review and meta-analysis. In: Addiction. 2016 ; Vol. 111, No. 12. pp. 2134-2144.
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abstract = "BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Performance on cognitive tasks may be sensitive to acute smoking abstinence and may also predict whether quit attempts fail. Our aim was to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis to identify cognitive tasks sensitive to acute abstinence and predictive of smoking cessation success.METHODS: Embase, Medline, PsycInfo and Web of Science were searched up to March 2016. Studies were included if they enrolled adults and assessed smoking using a quantitative measure. Studies were combined in a random effects meta-analysis.RESULTS: We included 42 acute abstinence studies and 13 cessation studies. There was evidence for an effect of abstinence on delay discounting [d = 0.26, 95{\%} confidence interval (CI) = 0.07-0.45, P = 0.005], response inhibition (d = 0.48, 95{\%} CI = 0.26-0.70, P < 0.001), mental arithmetic (d = 0.38, 95{\%} CI = 0.06-0.70, P = 0.018), and recognition memory (d = 0.46, 95{\%} CI = 0.23-0.70, P < 0.001). In contrast, performance on the Stroop (d = 0 .17, 95{\%} CI = -0.17-0.51, P = 0.333) and smoking Stroop (d = 0.03, 95{\%} CI = -0.11-0.17, P = 0.675) task was not influenced by abstinence. We found only weak evidence for an effect of acute abstinence on dot probe task performance (d = 0.15, 95{\%} CI = -0.01-0.32, P = 0.072). The design of the cessation studies was too heterogeneous to permit meta-analysis.CONCLUSIONS: Compared with satiated smokers, acutely abstinent smokers display higher delay discounting, lower response inhibition, impaired arithmetic and recognition memory performance. However, reaction-time measures of cognitive bias appear to be unaffected by acute tobacco abstinence. Conclusions about cognitive tasks that predict smoking cessation success were limited by methodological inconsistencies.",
keywords = "Adult, Cognitive Therapy/methods, Female, Humans, Male, Psychomotor Performance/physiology, Recurrence, Sample Size, Smoking Cessation/methods, Treatment Outcome",
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T1 - Behavioural tasks sensitive to acute abstinence and predictive of smoking cessation success

T2 - Addiction

AU - Grabski, Meryem

AU - Curran, H Valerie

AU - Nutt, David J

AU - Husbands, Stephen M

AU - Freeman, Tom P

AU - Fluharty, Meg

AU - Munafò, Marcus R

N1 - © 2016 The Authors. Addiction published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society for the Study of Addiction.

PY - 2016/12

Y1 - 2016/12

N2 - BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Performance on cognitive tasks may be sensitive to acute smoking abstinence and may also predict whether quit attempts fail. Our aim was to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis to identify cognitive tasks sensitive to acute abstinence and predictive of smoking cessation success.METHODS: Embase, Medline, PsycInfo and Web of Science were searched up to March 2016. Studies were included if they enrolled adults and assessed smoking using a quantitative measure. Studies were combined in a random effects meta-analysis.RESULTS: We included 42 acute abstinence studies and 13 cessation studies. There was evidence for an effect of abstinence on delay discounting [d = 0.26, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.07-0.45, P = 0.005], response inhibition (d = 0.48, 95% CI = 0.26-0.70, P < 0.001), mental arithmetic (d = 0.38, 95% CI = 0.06-0.70, P = 0.018), and recognition memory (d = 0.46, 95% CI = 0.23-0.70, P < 0.001). In contrast, performance on the Stroop (d = 0 .17, 95% CI = -0.17-0.51, P = 0.333) and smoking Stroop (d = 0.03, 95% CI = -0.11-0.17, P = 0.675) task was not influenced by abstinence. We found only weak evidence for an effect of acute abstinence on dot probe task performance (d = 0.15, 95% CI = -0.01-0.32, P = 0.072). The design of the cessation studies was too heterogeneous to permit meta-analysis.CONCLUSIONS: Compared with satiated smokers, acutely abstinent smokers display higher delay discounting, lower response inhibition, impaired arithmetic and recognition memory performance. However, reaction-time measures of cognitive bias appear to be unaffected by acute tobacco abstinence. Conclusions about cognitive tasks that predict smoking cessation success were limited by methodological inconsistencies.

AB - BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Performance on cognitive tasks may be sensitive to acute smoking abstinence and may also predict whether quit attempts fail. Our aim was to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis to identify cognitive tasks sensitive to acute abstinence and predictive of smoking cessation success.METHODS: Embase, Medline, PsycInfo and Web of Science were searched up to March 2016. Studies were included if they enrolled adults and assessed smoking using a quantitative measure. Studies were combined in a random effects meta-analysis.RESULTS: We included 42 acute abstinence studies and 13 cessation studies. There was evidence for an effect of abstinence on delay discounting [d = 0.26, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.07-0.45, P = 0.005], response inhibition (d = 0.48, 95% CI = 0.26-0.70, P < 0.001), mental arithmetic (d = 0.38, 95% CI = 0.06-0.70, P = 0.018), and recognition memory (d = 0.46, 95% CI = 0.23-0.70, P < 0.001). In contrast, performance on the Stroop (d = 0 .17, 95% CI = -0.17-0.51, P = 0.333) and smoking Stroop (d = 0.03, 95% CI = -0.11-0.17, P = 0.675) task was not influenced by abstinence. We found only weak evidence for an effect of acute abstinence on dot probe task performance (d = 0.15, 95% CI = -0.01-0.32, P = 0.072). The design of the cessation studies was too heterogeneous to permit meta-analysis.CONCLUSIONS: Compared with satiated smokers, acutely abstinent smokers display higher delay discounting, lower response inhibition, impaired arithmetic and recognition memory performance. However, reaction-time measures of cognitive bias appear to be unaffected by acute tobacco abstinence. Conclusions about cognitive tasks that predict smoking cessation success were limited by methodological inconsistencies.

KW - Adult

KW - Cognitive Therapy/methods

KW - Female

KW - Humans

KW - Male

KW - Psychomotor Performance/physiology

KW - Recurrence

KW - Sample Size

KW - Smoking Cessation/methods

KW - Treatment Outcome

U2 - 10.1111/add.13507

DO - 10.1111/add.13507

M3 - Review article

VL - 111

SP - 2134

EP - 2144

JO - Addiction

JF - Addiction

SN - 0965-2140

IS - 12

ER -