Barriers to engagement with a personal informatics productivity tool

Emily I.M. Collins, Anna L. Cox, Jon Bird, Cassie Cornish-Tresstail

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Technology helps us get work done but also provides many distractions. As a result, seemingly unproductive activities such as social networking sites (SNS) cause considerable stress. This paper reports a series of studies into whether personal informatics (PI) tools for productivity can make people more aware of their SNS usage and encourage behaviour change. The first two studies took an in-the-wild approach, encouraging students to use a PI tool, RescueTime, to improve their estimations of how much time they spent using SNS, in line with research that had used this technique to reduce participants' stress. However, participants simply did not engage with RescueTime in the studies. A further interview study found that there are four barriers that inhibit engagement with this PI tool and reduce its potential to facilitate behaviour change. In particular, the way it presents data lacks: salience; contextual information; credibility; and action advice.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 26th Australian Computer-Human Interaction Conference, OzCHI 2014
PublisherAssociation for Computing Machinery
Pages370-379
Number of pages10
ISBN (Electronic)9781450306539
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2 Dec 2014
Event26th Australian Computer-Human Interaction Conference, OzCHI 2014 - Sydney, Australia
Duration: 2 Dec 20145 Dec 2014

Conference

Conference26th Australian Computer-Human Interaction Conference, OzCHI 2014
CountryAustralia
CitySydney
Period2/12/145/12/14

Keywords

  • Barriers
  • Engagement
  • Personal informatics tools
  • Productivity
  • Social networking
  • Stress

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Science(all)
  • Human-Computer Interaction

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  • Cite this

    Collins, E. I. M., Cox, A. L., Bird, J., & Cornish-Tresstail, C. (2014). Barriers to engagement with a personal informatics productivity tool. In Proceedings of the 26th Australian Computer-Human Interaction Conference, OzCHI 2014 (pp. 370-379). Association for Computing Machinery. https://doi.org/10.1145/2686612.2686668