Attentional processing of faces in ASD: A dot-probe study

David J Moore, L Heavey, J Reidy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The present study used the Dot-Probe paradigm to explore attentional allocation to faces compared with non-social images in high-functioning individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and typically developing controls. There was no evidence of attentional bias in either group when stimuli were presented at individually calculated sub-threshold levels. However, at supra-threshold presentation (200 ms), a face bias was found for control participants but not for those with ASD. These results add to evidence of reduced social interest in ASD, relative to controls, and further demonstrate when atypical social processing arises in the attentional time course.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2038-2045
JournalJournal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
Volume42
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2012

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Autism Spectrum Disorder
Attentional Bias

Keywords

  • faces
  • autism
  • social
  • attention
  • dot-probe

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Attentional processing of faces in ASD: A dot-probe study. / Moore, David J; Heavey, L; Reidy, J.

In: Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, Vol. 42, No. 10, 10.2012, p. 2038-2045.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Moore, David J ; Heavey, L ; Reidy, J. / Attentional processing of faces in ASD: A dot-probe study. In: Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders. 2012 ; Vol. 42, No. 10. pp. 2038-2045.
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