Associations between objectively assessed physical activity and indicators of body fatness in 9- to 10-y-old European children: a population-based study from 4 distinct regions in Europe (the European Youth Heart Study)

U Ekelund, L B Sardinha, S A Anderssen, M Harro, P W Franks, S Brage, A R Cooper, L B Andersen, C Riddoch, K Froberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

306 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The rising prevalence of obesity in children may be due to a reduction in physical activity (PA). Objective: Our aim was to study the associations of objectively measured PA volume and its subcomponents with indicators of body fatness. Design: A cross-sectional study of 1292 children aged 9-10 y from 4 distinct regions in Europe (Odense, Denmark; the island of Madeira, Portugal; Oslo; and Tartu, Estonia) was conducted. PA was measured by accelerometry, and indicators of body fatness were the sum of 5 skinfold thicknesses and body mass index (BMI; in kg/m(2)). We examined the associations between PA and body fatness by using general linear models adjusted for potential confounding variables. Results: After adjustment for sex, study location, sexual maturity, birth weight, and parental BMI, time (min/d) spent at moderate and vigorous PA (P = 0.032) and time (min/d) spent at vigorous PA were significantly (P = 0.015) and independently associated with body fatness. Sex, study location, sexual maturity, birth weight, and parental BMI explained 29% (adjusted R-2 = 0.29) of the variation in body fatness. Time spent at vigorous PA explained an additional 0.5%. Children who accumulated
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)584-590
Number of pages7
JournalThe American Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume80
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - 2004

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