Association of Daily Workload, Wellness, Injury and Illness during Tours in International Cricketers

Robert Ahmun, Steve McGraig, Jamie Tallent, Sean Williams, Tim Gabbett

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Purpose: To examine the relationship between player internal workloads, daily wellness monitoring, and injury and illness in a group of elite adolescent cricketers during overseas competitions. Methods: A total of 39 male international adolescent cricketers (17.5 [0.8] y) took part in the study. Data were collected over 5 tours across a 3-y period (2014–2016). Measures of wellness were recorded and daily training loads were calculated using session rating of perceived exertion. The injury and illness status of each member of the squad was recorded daily. Acute and chronic workloads were calculated using 3-d and 14-d moving averages. Acute workloads, chronic workloads, and acute chronic workload ratios were independently modeled as fixed effects predictor variables. Results: In the subsequent week, a high 3-d workload was significantly associated with an increased risk of injury (relative risk = 2.51; CI = 1.70–3.70). Similarly, a high 14-d workload was also associated with an increased risk of injury (relative risk = 1.48; CI = 1.01–2.70). Individual differences in the load–injury relationship were also found. No clear relationship between the acute chronic workload ratios and injury risk was found, but high chronic workloads combined with high or low acute chronic workload ratios showed an increased probability of injury compared with moderate chronic workloads. There were also trends for sleep quality and cold symptoms worsening the week before an injury occurred. Conclusion: Although there is significant individual variation, short-term high workloads and change in wellness status appear to be associated with injury risk.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)369-377
Number of pages9
JournalInternational Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance
Volume14
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 2019

Keywords

  • Acute:chronic ratio
  • Cricket

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

Association of Daily Workload, Wellness, Injury and Illness during Tours in International Cricketers. / Ahmun, Robert; McGraig, Steve; Tallent, Jamie; Williams, Sean; Gabbett, Tim.

In: International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance, Vol. 14, No. 3, 01.03.2019, p. 369-377.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{43dfd0fa8f5641d38c41bb92bf316106,
title = "Association of Daily Workload, Wellness, Injury and Illness during Tours in International Cricketers",
abstract = "Purpose: To examine the relationship between player internal workloads, daily wellness monitoring, and injury and illness in a group of elite adolescent cricketers during overseas competitions. Methods: A total of 39 male international adolescent cricketers (17.5 [0.8] y) took part in the study. Data were collected over 5 tours across a 3-y period (2014–2016). Measures of wellness were recorded and daily training loads were calculated using session rating of perceived exertion. The injury and illness status of each member of the squad was recorded daily. Acute and chronic workloads were calculated using 3-d and 14-d moving averages. Acute workloads, chronic workloads, and acute chronic workload ratios were independently modeled as fixed effects predictor variables. Results: In the subsequent week, a high 3-d workload was significantly associated with an increased risk of injury (relative risk = 2.51; CI = 1.70–3.70). Similarly, a high 14-d workload was also associated with an increased risk of injury (relative risk = 1.48; CI = 1.01–2.70). Individual differences in the load–injury relationship were also found. No clear relationship between the acute chronic workload ratios and injury risk was found, but high chronic workloads combined with high or low acute chronic workload ratios showed an increased probability of injury compared with moderate chronic workloads. There were also trends for sleep quality and cold symptoms worsening the week before an injury occurred. Conclusion: Although there is significant individual variation, short-term high workloads and change in wellness status appear to be associated with injury risk.",
keywords = "Acute:chronic ratio, Cricket",
author = "Robert Ahmun and Steve McGraig and Jamie Tallent and Sean Williams and Tim Gabbett",
year = "2019",
month = "3",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1123/ijspp.2018-0315",
language = "English",
volume = "14",
pages = "369--377",
journal = "International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance",
issn = "1555-0265",
publisher = "Human Kinetics Publishers Inc.",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Association of Daily Workload, Wellness, Injury and Illness during Tours in International Cricketers

AU - Ahmun, Robert

AU - McGraig, Steve

AU - Tallent, Jamie

AU - Williams, Sean

AU - Gabbett, Tim

PY - 2019/3/1

Y1 - 2019/3/1

N2 - Purpose: To examine the relationship between player internal workloads, daily wellness monitoring, and injury and illness in a group of elite adolescent cricketers during overseas competitions. Methods: A total of 39 male international adolescent cricketers (17.5 [0.8] y) took part in the study. Data were collected over 5 tours across a 3-y period (2014–2016). Measures of wellness were recorded and daily training loads were calculated using session rating of perceived exertion. The injury and illness status of each member of the squad was recorded daily. Acute and chronic workloads were calculated using 3-d and 14-d moving averages. Acute workloads, chronic workloads, and acute chronic workload ratios were independently modeled as fixed effects predictor variables. Results: In the subsequent week, a high 3-d workload was significantly associated with an increased risk of injury (relative risk = 2.51; CI = 1.70–3.70). Similarly, a high 14-d workload was also associated with an increased risk of injury (relative risk = 1.48; CI = 1.01–2.70). Individual differences in the load–injury relationship were also found. No clear relationship between the acute chronic workload ratios and injury risk was found, but high chronic workloads combined with high or low acute chronic workload ratios showed an increased probability of injury compared with moderate chronic workloads. There were also trends for sleep quality and cold symptoms worsening the week before an injury occurred. Conclusion: Although there is significant individual variation, short-term high workloads and change in wellness status appear to be associated with injury risk.

AB - Purpose: To examine the relationship between player internal workloads, daily wellness monitoring, and injury and illness in a group of elite adolescent cricketers during overseas competitions. Methods: A total of 39 male international adolescent cricketers (17.5 [0.8] y) took part in the study. Data were collected over 5 tours across a 3-y period (2014–2016). Measures of wellness were recorded and daily training loads were calculated using session rating of perceived exertion. The injury and illness status of each member of the squad was recorded daily. Acute and chronic workloads were calculated using 3-d and 14-d moving averages. Acute workloads, chronic workloads, and acute chronic workload ratios were independently modeled as fixed effects predictor variables. Results: In the subsequent week, a high 3-d workload was significantly associated with an increased risk of injury (relative risk = 2.51; CI = 1.70–3.70). Similarly, a high 14-d workload was also associated with an increased risk of injury (relative risk = 1.48; CI = 1.01–2.70). Individual differences in the load–injury relationship were also found. No clear relationship between the acute chronic workload ratios and injury risk was found, but high chronic workloads combined with high or low acute chronic workload ratios showed an increased probability of injury compared with moderate chronic workloads. There were also trends for sleep quality and cold symptoms worsening the week before an injury occurred. Conclusion: Although there is significant individual variation, short-term high workloads and change in wellness status appear to be associated with injury risk.

KW - Acute:chronic ratio

KW - Cricket

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85062177052&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1123/ijspp.2018-0315

DO - 10.1123/ijspp.2018-0315

M3 - Article

VL - 14

SP - 369

EP - 377

JO - International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance

JF - International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance

SN - 1555-0265

IS - 3

ER -