Association between socioeconomic status and prevalence of non-communicable diseases risk factors and comorbidities in Bangladesh: Findings from a nationwide cross-sectional survey

Tuhin Biswas, Nick Townsend, Md Saimul Islam, Md Rajibul Islam, Rajat Das Gupta, Sumon Kumar Das, Abdullah Al Mamun

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Objectives This study aimed to examine the prevalence and distribution in the comorbidity of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) among the adult population in Bangladesh by measures of socioeconomic status (SES). Design This was a cross-sectional study. Setting This study used Bangladesh Demographic and Health Survey 2011 data. Participants Total 8763 individuals aged ≥35 years were included. Primary and secondary outcome measures The primary outcome measures were diabetes mellitus (DM), hypertension (HTN) and overweight/obesity. The study further assesses factors (in particular SES) associated with these comorbidities (DM, HTN and overweight/obesity). Results Of 8763 adults, 12% had DM, 27% HTN and 22% were overweight/obese (body mass index ≥23 kg/m2). Just over 1% of the sample had all three conditions, 3% had both DM and HTN, 3% DM and overweight/obesity and 7% HTN and overweight/obesity. DM, HTN and overweight/obesity were more prevalent those who had higher education, were non-manual workers, were in the richer to richest SES and lived in urban settings. Individuals in higher SES groups were also more likely to suffer from comorbidities. In the multivariable analysis, it was found that individual belonging to the richest wealth quintile had the highest odds of having HTN (adjusted OR (AOR) 1.49, 95% CI 1.29 to 1.72), DM (AOR 1.63, 95% CI 1.25 to 2.14) and overweight/obesity (AOR 4.3, 95% CI 3.32 to 5.57). Conclusions In contrast to more affluent countries, individuals with NCDs risk factors and comorbidities are more common in higher SES individuals. Public health approaches must consider this social patterning in tackling NCDs in the country.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere025538
JournalBMJ Open
Volume9
Issue number3
Early online date13 Mar 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 13 Mar 2019

Keywords

  • Bangladesh
  • diabetes
  • hypertension
  • non-communicable disease
  • overweight
  • socioeconomic status

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Association between socioeconomic status and prevalence of non-communicable diseases risk factors and comorbidities in Bangladesh : Findings from a nationwide cross-sectional survey. / Biswas, Tuhin; Townsend, Nick; Islam, Md Saimul; Islam, Md Rajibul; Das Gupta, Rajat; Das, Sumon Kumar; Mamun, Abdullah Al.

In: BMJ Open, Vol. 9, No. 3, e025538, 13.03.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Biswas, Tuhin ; Townsend, Nick ; Islam, Md Saimul ; Islam, Md Rajibul ; Das Gupta, Rajat ; Das, Sumon Kumar ; Mamun, Abdullah Al. / Association between socioeconomic status and prevalence of non-communicable diseases risk factors and comorbidities in Bangladesh : Findings from a nationwide cross-sectional survey. In: BMJ Open. 2019 ; Vol. 9, No. 3.
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abstract = "Objectives This study aimed to examine the prevalence and distribution in the comorbidity of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) among the adult population in Bangladesh by measures of socioeconomic status (SES). Design This was a cross-sectional study. Setting This study used Bangladesh Demographic and Health Survey 2011 data. Participants Total 8763 individuals aged ≥35 years were included. Primary and secondary outcome measures The primary outcome measures were diabetes mellitus (DM), hypertension (HTN) and overweight/obesity. The study further assesses factors (in particular SES) associated with these comorbidities (DM, HTN and overweight/obesity). Results Of 8763 adults, 12{\%} had DM, 27{\%} HTN and 22{\%} were overweight/obese (body mass index ≥23 kg/m2). Just over 1{\%} of the sample had all three conditions, 3{\%} had both DM and HTN, 3{\%} DM and overweight/obesity and 7{\%} HTN and overweight/obesity. DM, HTN and overweight/obesity were more prevalent those who had higher education, were non-manual workers, were in the richer to richest SES and lived in urban settings. Individuals in higher SES groups were also more likely to suffer from comorbidities. In the multivariable analysis, it was found that individual belonging to the richest wealth quintile had the highest odds of having HTN (adjusted OR (AOR) 1.49, 95{\%} CI 1.29 to 1.72), DM (AOR 1.63, 95{\%} CI 1.25 to 2.14) and overweight/obesity (AOR 4.3, 95{\%} CI 3.32 to 5.57). Conclusions In contrast to more affluent countries, individuals with NCDs risk factors and comorbidities are more common in higher SES individuals. Public health approaches must consider this social patterning in tackling NCDs in the country.",
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T1 - Association between socioeconomic status and prevalence of non-communicable diseases risk factors and comorbidities in Bangladesh

T2 - Findings from a nationwide cross-sectional survey

AU - Biswas, Tuhin

AU - Townsend, Nick

AU - Islam, Md Saimul

AU - Islam, Md Rajibul

AU - Das Gupta, Rajat

AU - Das, Sumon Kumar

AU - Mamun, Abdullah Al

PY - 2019/3/13

Y1 - 2019/3/13

N2 - Objectives This study aimed to examine the prevalence and distribution in the comorbidity of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) among the adult population in Bangladesh by measures of socioeconomic status (SES). Design This was a cross-sectional study. Setting This study used Bangladesh Demographic and Health Survey 2011 data. Participants Total 8763 individuals aged ≥35 years were included. Primary and secondary outcome measures The primary outcome measures were diabetes mellitus (DM), hypertension (HTN) and overweight/obesity. The study further assesses factors (in particular SES) associated with these comorbidities (DM, HTN and overweight/obesity). Results Of 8763 adults, 12% had DM, 27% HTN and 22% were overweight/obese (body mass index ≥23 kg/m2). Just over 1% of the sample had all three conditions, 3% had both DM and HTN, 3% DM and overweight/obesity and 7% HTN and overweight/obesity. DM, HTN and overweight/obesity were more prevalent those who had higher education, were non-manual workers, were in the richer to richest SES and lived in urban settings. Individuals in higher SES groups were also more likely to suffer from comorbidities. In the multivariable analysis, it was found that individual belonging to the richest wealth quintile had the highest odds of having HTN (adjusted OR (AOR) 1.49, 95% CI 1.29 to 1.72), DM (AOR 1.63, 95% CI 1.25 to 2.14) and overweight/obesity (AOR 4.3, 95% CI 3.32 to 5.57). Conclusions In contrast to more affluent countries, individuals with NCDs risk factors and comorbidities are more common in higher SES individuals. Public health approaches must consider this social patterning in tackling NCDs in the country.

AB - Objectives This study aimed to examine the prevalence and distribution in the comorbidity of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) among the adult population in Bangladesh by measures of socioeconomic status (SES). Design This was a cross-sectional study. Setting This study used Bangladesh Demographic and Health Survey 2011 data. Participants Total 8763 individuals aged ≥35 years were included. Primary and secondary outcome measures The primary outcome measures were diabetes mellitus (DM), hypertension (HTN) and overweight/obesity. The study further assesses factors (in particular SES) associated with these comorbidities (DM, HTN and overweight/obesity). Results Of 8763 adults, 12% had DM, 27% HTN and 22% were overweight/obese (body mass index ≥23 kg/m2). Just over 1% of the sample had all three conditions, 3% had both DM and HTN, 3% DM and overweight/obesity and 7% HTN and overweight/obesity. DM, HTN and overweight/obesity were more prevalent those who had higher education, were non-manual workers, were in the richer to richest SES and lived in urban settings. Individuals in higher SES groups were also more likely to suffer from comorbidities. In the multivariable analysis, it was found that individual belonging to the richest wealth quintile had the highest odds of having HTN (adjusted OR (AOR) 1.49, 95% CI 1.29 to 1.72), DM (AOR 1.63, 95% CI 1.25 to 2.14) and overweight/obesity (AOR 4.3, 95% CI 3.32 to 5.57). Conclusions In contrast to more affluent countries, individuals with NCDs risk factors and comorbidities are more common in higher SES individuals. Public health approaches must consider this social patterning in tackling NCDs in the country.

KW - Bangladesh

KW - diabetes

KW - hypertension

KW - non-communicable disease

KW - overweight

KW - socioeconomic status

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U2 - 10.1136/bmjopen-2018-025538

DO - 10.1136/bmjopen-2018-025538

M3 - Review article

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VL - 9

JO - BMJ Open

JF - BMJ Open

SN - 2044-6055

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