Assessing the importance of the slow drift motion of floating wind turbine platforms

Richard C. Lupton, Robin S. Langley

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

As offshore wind turbines are installed in deeper water, interest is growing in floating wind turbines because, among other reasons, they may become cheaper than fixed-bottom turbines at greater depths. When analysing floating wind turbines, linear diffraction theory is commonly used to model the hydrodynamic loads on the platform. While it well known that slow drift motion due to second-order loads can be important for other floating offshore platforms, it has not yet been established how important such effects are for floating wind turbines. In this paper we aim to give a general result by developing approximate closed-form expressions to estimate the second-order slow drift motion of platforms of different sizes. The values are benchmarked against a typical calculation of the slow-drift response of a platform. The results show that floating wind turbines, which tend to have smaller dimensions than other floating structures, may be expected to show smaller slow-drift motions.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationOcean Renewable Energy
PublisherAmerican Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME)
Volume9A
ISBN (Electronic)9780791845530
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2014
EventASME 2014 33rd International Conference on Ocean, Offshore and Arctic Engineering, OMAE 2014 - San Francisco, USA United States
Duration: 8 Jun 201413 Jun 2014

Conference

ConferenceASME 2014 33rd International Conference on Ocean, Offshore and Arctic Engineering, OMAE 2014
CountryUSA United States
CitySan Francisco
Period8/06/1413/06/14

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ocean Engineering
  • Energy Engineering and Power Technology
  • Mechanical Engineering

Cite this

Lupton, R. C., & Langley, R. S. (2014). Assessing the importance of the slow drift motion of floating wind turbine platforms. In Ocean Renewable Energy (Vol. 9A). American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME). https://doi.org/10.1115/OMAE2014-23859