Are pedestrian crossings in the UK fit for purpose? Comparing the current crossing times with the gait-speed of older adults at risk for mobility-related disability

Max Western, Janet Withall, Jolanthe De Koning, Janice L Thompson, Colin Greaves, Jessica Bollen, Sarah Moorlock, Kenneth R Fox, Afroditi Stathi

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstract

Abstract

Background
Pedestrian crossings in the UK require pedestrians to walk at least 1.2m/s to get across before the lights change. Forty-two % of adults ≥ 65 years have a degree of mobility impairment and for them, this assumption might be inappropriate. This study examined the average walking speed of a cohort of older adults at risk for mobility-related disability and identified the proportion who could walk at 1.2m/s.

Methods
Adults aged ≥65 years at risk for mobility-related disability (defined as scoring between 4 and 9 out of 12 on the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB)) participating in a multi-site, RCT, completed two, four-meter walks as part of their baseline assessment. The average walking speed for various sub-groups (defined by gender, age, SPPB score) were calculated and compared using ANOVA.

Results
A total of 768 participants [66% female; mean (SD) age=77.6(6.9)] walked at an average(95% confidence intervals) speed of 0.76m/s. Females were slower (0.75 (0.73-0.76) m/s) than males (0.78 (0.76-0.80) m/s) p=0.016. The average walking speed for both males and females decreased with age: 0.80 (0.78-0.82) m/s for 65-74 year olds (n=281); 0.75 (0.73-0.77) m/s for 75-84 year olds (n=346); and 0.71 (0.68-0.74) m/s for those 85+ years (n=141) (p=0.036). Frailty status was associated with walking speed, whereby those with an SPPB score of 4-7 (n=340) walked at 0.64 (0.63-0.66) m/s as compared to those with SPPB score of 8-9 (n=428) who walked at 0.85 (0.84-0.87) m/s (p=0.000). Only 11 (1.4%) of all participants would be able to cross at 1.2m/s.

Conclusions and Implications
The expected walking speed of 1.2m/s at pedestrian crossings is unfeasible for a cohort of older adults at risk of mobility-related disability. An upstream, national policy of increasing crossing times could contribute to more age- and mobility-friendly walking environments.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusUnpublished - 2018
EventUKSBM 14th Annual Scientific Meeting - Birmingham 2018 -
Duration: 12 Dec 201813 Dec 2018

Conference

ConferenceUKSBM 14th Annual Scientific Meeting - Birmingham 2018
Period12/12/1813/12/18

Cite this

Western, M., Withall, J., De Koning, J., Thompson, J. L., Greaves, C., Bollen, J., ... Stathi, A. (2018). Are pedestrian crossings in the UK fit for purpose? Comparing the current crossing times with the gait-speed of older adults at risk for mobility-related disability. Abstract from UKSBM 14th Annual Scientific Meeting - Birmingham 2018, .

Are pedestrian crossings in the UK fit for purpose? Comparing the current crossing times with the gait-speed of older adults at risk for mobility-related disability. / Western, Max; Withall, Janet; De Koning, Jolanthe; Thompson, Janice L; Greaves, Colin; Bollen, Jessica; Moorlock, Sarah; Fox, Kenneth R; Stathi, Afroditi.

2018. Abstract from UKSBM 14th Annual Scientific Meeting - Birmingham 2018, .

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstract

Western, M, Withall, J, De Koning, J, Thompson, JL, Greaves, C, Bollen, J, Moorlock, S, Fox, KR & Stathi, A 2018, 'Are pedestrian crossings in the UK fit for purpose? Comparing the current crossing times with the gait-speed of older adults at risk for mobility-related disability' UKSBM 14th Annual Scientific Meeting - Birmingham 2018, 12/12/18 - 13/12/18, .
Western M, Withall J, De Koning J, Thompson JL, Greaves C, Bollen J et al. Are pedestrian crossings in the UK fit for purpose? Comparing the current crossing times with the gait-speed of older adults at risk for mobility-related disability. 2018. Abstract from UKSBM 14th Annual Scientific Meeting - Birmingham 2018, .
Western, Max ; Withall, Janet ; De Koning, Jolanthe ; Thompson, Janice L ; Greaves, Colin ; Bollen, Jessica ; Moorlock, Sarah ; Fox, Kenneth R ; Stathi, Afroditi. / Are pedestrian crossings in the UK fit for purpose? Comparing the current crossing times with the gait-speed of older adults at risk for mobility-related disability. Abstract from UKSBM 14th Annual Scientific Meeting - Birmingham 2018, .
@conference{007360106ae24b96aa31a74d71f81fa3,
title = "Are pedestrian crossings in the UK fit for purpose? Comparing the current crossing times with the gait-speed of older adults at risk for mobility-related disability",
abstract = "BackgroundPedestrian crossings in the UK require pedestrians to walk at least 1.2m/s to get across before the lights change. Forty-two {\%} of adults ≥ 65 years have a degree of mobility impairment and for them, this assumption might be inappropriate. This study examined the average walking speed of a cohort of older adults at risk for mobility-related disability and identified the proportion who could walk at 1.2m/s. MethodsAdults aged ≥65 years at risk for mobility-related disability (defined as scoring between 4 and 9 out of 12 on the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB)) participating in a multi-site, RCT, completed two, four-meter walks as part of their baseline assessment. The average walking speed for various sub-groups (defined by gender, age, SPPB score) were calculated and compared using ANOVA. ResultsA total of 768 participants [66{\%} female; mean (SD) age=77.6(6.9)] walked at an average(95{\%} confidence intervals) speed of 0.76m/s. Females were slower (0.75 (0.73-0.76) m/s) than males (0.78 (0.76-0.80) m/s) p=0.016. The average walking speed for both males and females decreased with age: 0.80 (0.78-0.82) m/s for 65-74 year olds (n=281); 0.75 (0.73-0.77) m/s for 75-84 year olds (n=346); and 0.71 (0.68-0.74) m/s for those 85+ years (n=141) (p=0.036). Frailty status was associated with walking speed, whereby those with an SPPB score of 4-7 (n=340) walked at 0.64 (0.63-0.66) m/s as compared to those with SPPB score of 8-9 (n=428) who walked at 0.85 (0.84-0.87) m/s (p=0.000). Only 11 (1.4{\%}) of all participants would be able to cross at 1.2m/s. Conclusions and ImplicationsThe expected walking speed of 1.2m/s at pedestrian crossings is unfeasible for a cohort of older adults at risk of mobility-related disability. An upstream, national policy of increasing crossing times could contribute to more age- and mobility-friendly walking environments.",
author = "Max Western and Janet Withall and {De Koning}, Jolanthe and Thompson, {Janice L} and Colin Greaves and Jessica Bollen and Sarah Moorlock and Fox, {Kenneth R} and Afroditi Stathi",
year = "2018",
language = "English",
note = "UKSBM 14th Annual Scientific Meeting - Birmingham 2018 ; Conference date: 12-12-2018 Through 13-12-2018",

}

TY - CONF

T1 - Are pedestrian crossings in the UK fit for purpose? Comparing the current crossing times with the gait-speed of older adults at risk for mobility-related disability

AU - Western, Max

AU - Withall, Janet

AU - De Koning, Jolanthe

AU - Thompson, Janice L

AU - Greaves, Colin

AU - Bollen, Jessica

AU - Moorlock, Sarah

AU - Fox, Kenneth R

AU - Stathi, Afroditi

PY - 2018

Y1 - 2018

N2 - BackgroundPedestrian crossings in the UK require pedestrians to walk at least 1.2m/s to get across before the lights change. Forty-two % of adults ≥ 65 years have a degree of mobility impairment and for them, this assumption might be inappropriate. This study examined the average walking speed of a cohort of older adults at risk for mobility-related disability and identified the proportion who could walk at 1.2m/s. MethodsAdults aged ≥65 years at risk for mobility-related disability (defined as scoring between 4 and 9 out of 12 on the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB)) participating in a multi-site, RCT, completed two, four-meter walks as part of their baseline assessment. The average walking speed for various sub-groups (defined by gender, age, SPPB score) were calculated and compared using ANOVA. ResultsA total of 768 participants [66% female; mean (SD) age=77.6(6.9)] walked at an average(95% confidence intervals) speed of 0.76m/s. Females were slower (0.75 (0.73-0.76) m/s) than males (0.78 (0.76-0.80) m/s) p=0.016. The average walking speed for both males and females decreased with age: 0.80 (0.78-0.82) m/s for 65-74 year olds (n=281); 0.75 (0.73-0.77) m/s for 75-84 year olds (n=346); and 0.71 (0.68-0.74) m/s for those 85+ years (n=141) (p=0.036). Frailty status was associated with walking speed, whereby those with an SPPB score of 4-7 (n=340) walked at 0.64 (0.63-0.66) m/s as compared to those with SPPB score of 8-9 (n=428) who walked at 0.85 (0.84-0.87) m/s (p=0.000). Only 11 (1.4%) of all participants would be able to cross at 1.2m/s. Conclusions and ImplicationsThe expected walking speed of 1.2m/s at pedestrian crossings is unfeasible for a cohort of older adults at risk of mobility-related disability. An upstream, national policy of increasing crossing times could contribute to more age- and mobility-friendly walking environments.

AB - BackgroundPedestrian crossings in the UK require pedestrians to walk at least 1.2m/s to get across before the lights change. Forty-two % of adults ≥ 65 years have a degree of mobility impairment and for them, this assumption might be inappropriate. This study examined the average walking speed of a cohort of older adults at risk for mobility-related disability and identified the proportion who could walk at 1.2m/s. MethodsAdults aged ≥65 years at risk for mobility-related disability (defined as scoring between 4 and 9 out of 12 on the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB)) participating in a multi-site, RCT, completed two, four-meter walks as part of their baseline assessment. The average walking speed for various sub-groups (defined by gender, age, SPPB score) were calculated and compared using ANOVA. ResultsA total of 768 participants [66% female; mean (SD) age=77.6(6.9)] walked at an average(95% confidence intervals) speed of 0.76m/s. Females were slower (0.75 (0.73-0.76) m/s) than males (0.78 (0.76-0.80) m/s) p=0.016. The average walking speed for both males and females decreased with age: 0.80 (0.78-0.82) m/s for 65-74 year olds (n=281); 0.75 (0.73-0.77) m/s for 75-84 year olds (n=346); and 0.71 (0.68-0.74) m/s for those 85+ years (n=141) (p=0.036). Frailty status was associated with walking speed, whereby those with an SPPB score of 4-7 (n=340) walked at 0.64 (0.63-0.66) m/s as compared to those with SPPB score of 8-9 (n=428) who walked at 0.85 (0.84-0.87) m/s (p=0.000). Only 11 (1.4%) of all participants would be able to cross at 1.2m/s. Conclusions and ImplicationsThe expected walking speed of 1.2m/s at pedestrian crossings is unfeasible for a cohort of older adults at risk of mobility-related disability. An upstream, national policy of increasing crossing times could contribute to more age- and mobility-friendly walking environments.

M3 - Abstract

ER -