Anticipating self-stigma: The roles of values and perceptions of therapy clients

Dan G. Lannin, Lukas J. Wolf, Patrick J. Heath

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Abstract

The present study examined how similarities and differences between participants’ prioritization of their own values and their perceptions of therapy clients’ values predicted anticipated self-stigma of seeking psychological help. Undergraduates (N = 231) sorted the importance of 10 personal values for themselves and an imagined therapy client before completing an assessment of anticipated self-stigma of seeking psychological help. Polynomial regression analyses examined interaction effects between participants’ own values and their perceptions of a hypothetical therapy client’s values on anticipated help-seeking self-stigma. Self-stigma was predicted by the interaction between a person’s own values of security and achievement and their perceptions of a therapy client’s values of security and achievement. First, self-stigma was higher for those who prioritize achievement but view typical therapy clients as people who do not. Second, self-stigma was higher for those who prioritize security and also view typical therapy clients as people who also do.

Original languageEnglish
JournalStigma and Health
Early online date13 Mar 2023
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 13 Mar 2023

Bibliographical note

This research did not receive any specific grant from funding agencies in the public, commercial, or not-for-profit sectors.

The data set generated during and/or analyzed during the presentstudy is available from the corresponding author on reasonable request

Keywords

  • Anticipated Self-Stigma
  • Help-Seeking
  • Polynomial Regression
  • Psychological Help
  • Values

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Health Policy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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