Anthropologists and the challenge of modernity: global concerns, local responses in EU agriculture

Marion Demossier

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The article examines the developments and challenges faced by both anthropologists and rural communities since the 1960s. Looking at the parallel transition experienced By anthropologists working on Europe and farming communities experiencing European integration, I argue that a shift in methodological and thematic terms has occurred raising a number of issues for the establishment of a research agenda on the Anthropology of Europe. The most important shift concerns the reconfiguration of rural Europe, from the farm or village to more ‘complex’ social settings in which the presence of the state, bureaucracies, new social actors and markets are integrated into local phenomena. Attached to this rescaling is the issue of how anthropologists define their fieldwork and the objects of their study. Finally, heritage and conservation which are at the heart of the process of a European core identity and of a European rural imaginary provide a new critical framework to think about the connection between local concerns and global changes.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)111-131
Number of pages21
JournalAnthropological Journal of European Culture
Volume20
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011

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modernity
EU
agriculture
european identity
global change
social actor
European integration
bureaucracy
rural community
anthropology
farm
village
conservation
market
community

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Anthropologists and the challenge of modernity: global concerns, local responses in EU agriculture. / Demossier, Marion.

In: Anthropological Journal of European Culture, Vol. 20, No. 1, 2011, p. 111-131.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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