An Investigation into the Effects of Using Dynamic Representation to Reflect Users’ Emotional States During Physical Activity

Holly Dent

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Abstract

Many people struggle to maintain exercise routines (Biddle and Fox, 1989). Affective state (emotion, mood and sentiment) plays a key role in supporting or undermining intentions to exercise (Hanin, 2000). Presenting users with representations of their emotions can result in positive adjustments to their behavior (Brave and Nass, 2002). This project aimed to evaluate the impact of running with such a representation on a user’s positivity during a run, and upon its completion.
A mobile application, EmotiRun, was iteratively designed to capture user feelings whilst running via self-reporting functionality; using this to dynamically represent inferences made of the positivity of the positivity of a user’s emotional state.
A user study with EmotiRun didn’t reveal significant differences in positivity with an ‘emotional’ display present. Participants did however note their awareness of the dynamic representation changing, and its potential as a motivational cue. The design and evaluation context in the physical setting of running are considered in relation to the fields of Affective Computing, and more broadly Human Computer Interaction. Further work is proposed to build upon the study method and design approach, of in-situ real-time self-reporting for physical activities.
Original languageEnglish
Place of PublicationBath, U. K.
PublisherDepartment of Computer Science, University of Bath
Number of pages133
Publication statusPublished - May 2017

Publication series

NameDepartment of Computer Science Technical Report Series
ISSN (Electronic)1740-9497

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Dent, H. (2017). An Investigation into the Effects of Using Dynamic Representation to Reflect Users’ Emotional States During Physical Activity. (Department of Computer Science Technical Report Series). Bath, U. K.: Department of Computer Science, University of Bath.