An investigation into GPs' perceptions of children's mental health problems

Christopher Jacobs, Maria Elizabeth Loades

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2 Citations (Scopus)
112 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

BackgroundMental health disorders in children are common. General practitioners (GPs) have a significant role in the detection of these disorders, yet there is lack of evidence to assess this ability. This study aimed to explore GPs' recognition of children's mental health problems, examining GPs' ability to identify both a common emotional and behavioural disorder.MethodBetween November 2014 and March 2015, an online survey-based questionnaire measure was used, composed of a series of six clinical vignettes designed to assess GPs' mental health literacy with respect to children of primary school age. This included recognition accuracy, rating of problem severity, and degree of concern about hypothetical cases, described in the vignettes.ResultsOf the 97 participants, all identified the clinical level separation anxiety disorder and 97.9% identified the clinical level oppositional defiant disorder. Nonparametric analyses identified a significant difference (Z = −5.44, p < .0001, r = .55) in the GPs' concern for the child with clinical oppositional defiant disorder versus the concern for the child with clinical separation anxiety disorder. Participants were significantly more concerned about a boy presenting with clinical separation anxiety (Z = −7.18, p < .001, r = .72) than a girl. Also, participants were significantly more concerned about a boy presenting with clinical level oppositional defiance (Z = −7.79, p < .001, r = .79).ConclusionThis study shows the majority of GPs can identify a primary school child with clinical level symptoms of either a common emotional or behavioural disorder described in a written vignette. However, GPs were more concerned when the child was male or displaying symptoms of a behavioural disorder.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)90-95
JournalChild and Adolescent Mental Health
Volume21
Issue number2
Early online date30 Jan 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2016

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General Practitioners
Mental Health
Separation Anxiety
Attention Deficit and Disruptive Behavior Disorders
Aptitude
Health Literacy
Behavioral Symptoms
Child Health
Health

Cite this

An investigation into GPs' perceptions of children's mental health problems. / Jacobs, Christopher; Loades, Maria Elizabeth.

In: Child and Adolescent Mental Health, Vol. 21, No. 2, 05.2016, p. 90-95.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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