An innovative approach to manufacture thin-walled glass fibre reinforced concrete for tomorrow's architectural buildings envelopes with complex geometries

Thomas Henriksen, Stephen Lo, Ulrich Knaack

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Abstract

Glass fibre reinforced concrete (GFRC) elements have become a sought after cladding material since their introduction as rain screen cladding for buildings. To advance GFRC for a range of complex geometry building envelopes this also requires advances in existing moulding techniques for thin-walled GFRC elements. To do so it is necessary to define the current state of thin-walled GFRC elements and the constraints and limits placed on them by existing production techniques. This paper identifies the current architectural and aesthetic requirements of thin-walled GFRC elements and maps their range of complexity, from 1-D to 3-D, to the limits of the most appropriate production method. This will inform guidelines for the future design development of thin-walled GFRC and enable an innovative approach to further advance the moulding techniques for thin walled GFRC elements for a variety of complex geometry building envelopes. The paper concludes on which further steps need to be taken to advance thin-walled glass fibre reinforced concrete for tomorrow's architectural buildings envelopes with complex geometries.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)189-199
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Building Engineering
Volume4
Early online date14 Sep 2015
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2015

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Glass fibers
Reinforced concrete
Geometry
Molding
Rain

Cite this

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