An In Vitro Bladder Model for Studying Catheter- Associated Urinary Tract Infection and Associated Analysis of Biofilms

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Urethral catheters are among the most widely used medical devices, applied to manage a wide range of conditions in hospital, community, and care home settings. In long-term catheterized individuals, infection with Proteus mirabilis frequently complicates the care of patients owing to formation of extensive crystalline biofilms. Here we describe the use of an in vitro bladder model of the catheterized urinary tract and associated analyses to study P. mirabilis crystalline biofilm formation. The model originally described by Stickler et al. (1999, 310:494–501, Enzymol, Methods) replicates a complete sterile closed drainage system as used in clinical practice, and permits formation of biofilms directly on catheters under conditions representative of those encountered in vivo. Models may be used to replicate either established infection or early stage colonization, and we describe a range of associated methods for quantification and visualization of biofilms formed on catheters. These methods are also easily adapted to study catheter-associated biofilm formation by other urinary tract pathogens.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProteus mirabilis - Methods and Protocols
EditorsMelanie Pearson
PublisherSpringer Nature
Chapter14
Pages139-158
Number of pages20
ISBN (Print)9781493996018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 16 Jul 2019

Cite this

An In Vitro Bladder Model for Studying Catheter- Associated Urinary Tract Infection and Associated Analysis of Biofilms. / Nzakizwanayo, Jonathan; Pelling, Harriet; Milo, Scarlet; Jones, Brian.

Proteus mirabilis - Methods and Protocols. ed. / Melanie Pearson. Springer Nature, 2019. p. 139-158.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Nzakizwanayo, Jonathan ; Pelling, Harriet ; Milo, Scarlet ; Jones, Brian. / An In Vitro Bladder Model for Studying Catheter- Associated Urinary Tract Infection and Associated Analysis of Biofilms. Proteus mirabilis - Methods and Protocols. editor / Melanie Pearson. Springer Nature, 2019. pp. 139-158
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