An evaluation of the sustainability and impact of teaching Specialist Community Public Health Nurse students to work therapeutically with families.

Catherine Butler, Joanne Seal, Eleanor Raupaul

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Abstract

Background: This paper reports on the long term impact of an innovate module designed for Specialist Community Public Health Nursing (SCPHN) students entitled ‘Working Therapeutically with Families’. The module was designed to enhance student self-reflection around what they bring to their working relationships, and teach some specific systemic therapy techniques aimed at enhancing these relationships.

Objectives: We were specifically interested in the sustainability of the skills learnt for those who attended the module and whether any of these had been passed onto their team since qualifying.

Design: An anonymous online questionnaire design was used.

Participants: A random selection of students (N=43) from the final two years that the module ran were emailed; 18 took part in the study.

Methods: Questionnaire data was analysed by descriptive statistics and thematic analysis.

Results: Up to three years after completing the module, students were still using the ideas and some of them (e.g. genograms) had spread to be used by the current work teams. Students also reported that they found the skills of self-reflexivity useful in both their work and private lives.

Conclusion: A systemic therapy based module aimed at improving self and other understanding and working relationships is valuable to SCPHN training.
Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Health Visiting
Publication statusSubmitted - 13 May 2019

Keywords

  • Systemic Therapy
  • Health Visitors
  • School Nurses
  • Nurse Education

Cite this

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title = "An evaluation of the sustainability and impact of teaching Specialist Community Public Health Nurse students to work therapeutically with families.",
abstract = "Background: This paper reports on the long term impact of an innovate module designed for Specialist Community Public Health Nursing (SCPHN) students entitled ‘Working Therapeutically with Families’. The module was designed to enhance student self-reflection around what they bring to their working relationships, and teach some specific systemic therapy techniques aimed at enhancing these relationships.Objectives: We were specifically interested in the sustainability of the skills learnt for those who attended the module and whether any of these had been passed onto their team since qualifying.Design: An anonymous online questionnaire design was used.Participants: A random selection of students (N=43) from the final two years that the module ran were emailed; 18 took part in the study.Methods: Questionnaire data was analysed by descriptive statistics and thematic analysis.Results: Up to three years after completing the module, students were still using the ideas and some of them (e.g. genograms) had spread to be used by the current work teams. Students also reported that they found the skills of self-reflexivity useful in both their work and private lives.Conclusion: A systemic therapy based module aimed at improving self and other understanding and working relationships is valuable to SCPHN training.",
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author = "Catherine Butler and Joanne Seal and Eleanor Raupaul",
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journal = "Journal of Health Visiting",
issn = "2052-2908",
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T1 - An evaluation of the sustainability and impact of teaching Specialist Community Public Health Nurse students to work therapeutically with families.

AU - Butler, Catherine

AU - Seal, Joanne

AU - Raupaul, Eleanor

PY - 2019/5/13

Y1 - 2019/5/13

N2 - Background: This paper reports on the long term impact of an innovate module designed for Specialist Community Public Health Nursing (SCPHN) students entitled ‘Working Therapeutically with Families’. The module was designed to enhance student self-reflection around what they bring to their working relationships, and teach some specific systemic therapy techniques aimed at enhancing these relationships.Objectives: We were specifically interested in the sustainability of the skills learnt for those who attended the module and whether any of these had been passed onto their team since qualifying.Design: An anonymous online questionnaire design was used.Participants: A random selection of students (N=43) from the final two years that the module ran were emailed; 18 took part in the study.Methods: Questionnaire data was analysed by descriptive statistics and thematic analysis.Results: Up to three years after completing the module, students were still using the ideas and some of them (e.g. genograms) had spread to be used by the current work teams. Students also reported that they found the skills of self-reflexivity useful in both their work and private lives.Conclusion: A systemic therapy based module aimed at improving self and other understanding and working relationships is valuable to SCPHN training.

AB - Background: This paper reports on the long term impact of an innovate module designed for Specialist Community Public Health Nursing (SCPHN) students entitled ‘Working Therapeutically with Families’. The module was designed to enhance student self-reflection around what they bring to their working relationships, and teach some specific systemic therapy techniques aimed at enhancing these relationships.Objectives: We were specifically interested in the sustainability of the skills learnt for those who attended the module and whether any of these had been passed onto their team since qualifying.Design: An anonymous online questionnaire design was used.Participants: A random selection of students (N=43) from the final two years that the module ran were emailed; 18 took part in the study.Methods: Questionnaire data was analysed by descriptive statistics and thematic analysis.Results: Up to three years after completing the module, students were still using the ideas and some of them (e.g. genograms) had spread to be used by the current work teams. Students also reported that they found the skills of self-reflexivity useful in both their work and private lives.Conclusion: A systemic therapy based module aimed at improving self and other understanding and working relationships is valuable to SCPHN training.

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KW - Health Visitors

KW - School Nurses

KW - Nurse Education

M3 - Article

JO - Journal of Health Visiting

JF - Journal of Health Visiting

SN - 2052-2908

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