An empirical investigation of climate and land-use effects on water quantity and quality in two urbanising catchments in the southern United Kingdom

Banyu Putro, Thomas Kjeldsen, Mike G. Hutchins, James Miller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Citations (Scopus)
95 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Using historical data of climate, land-use, hydrology and water quality from four catchments located in the south of England, this study identifies the impact of climate and land-use change on selected water quantity and water quality indicators. The study utilises a paired catchment approach, with two catchments that have experienced a high degree of urbanisation over the past five decades and two nearby, hydrologically similar, but undeveloped catchments. Multivariate regression models were used to assess the influence of rainfall and urbanisation on runoff (annual and seasonal), dissolved oxygen levels and temperature. Results indicate: (i) no trend in annual or seasonal rainfall totals, (ii) upward trend in runoff totals in the two urban catchments but not in the rural catchments, (iii) upward trend in dissolved oxygen and temperature in the urban catchments, but not in the rural catchments, and (iv) changes in temperature and dissolved oxygen in the urban catchments are not driven by climatic variables.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)164–172
Number of pages9
JournalScience of the Total Environment
Volume548-549
Early online date21 Jan 2016
Publication statusPublished - 21 Jan 2016

Keywords

  • hydrology
  • urbanisation
  • water quality

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