Agent-based models as scientific methodology

A case study analysing the DomWorld theory of primate social structure and female dominance

Joanna J. Bryson, Yasushi Ando, Hagen Lehmann

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A scientific methodology must provide two things: first a means of explanation, and second, a mechanism for improving that explanation. It is also advantageous if a methodology facilitates communication between scientists. Agent-based modelling (ABM) is a method for exploring the collective effects of individual action selection. The explanatory force of the model is the extent to which an observed meta-level phenomena can be accounted for by the behaviour of its micro-level actors. But to demonstrate ABM is truly a scientific method, we must demonstrate that the theory it embodies can be verified, falsified, extended, and corrected. This chapter contains a case study demonstrating ABM as biological science. We show that agent-based models like any scientific hypotheses can be tested, critiqued, generalised, or specified. After first reviewing the state of the art for ABM as a methodology, we present our case: an analysis of Hemelrijk's DomWorld, a widely published model of primate social behaviour. Our analysis shows some significant discrepancies between the model and the behaviour of the genus we compare it to, the macaques. We then demonstrate that the explanation embodied in the DomWorld model is not fragile: its other results are still valid and can be extended to compensate for the problems identified. This robustness is a significant advantage of experiment-based artificial intelligence modelling techniques over purely analytic modelling. Agent-based modelling (ABM) is a method for testing the collective effects of individual action selection. More generally, ABM allows the examination of macro-level effects from micro-level behaviour. Science requires understanding how an observed characteristic of a system (e.g., a solid) can be accounted for by its components (e.g., molecules). In ABM we build models of both the components and the environment in which they exist, and then observe whether the overall system-level behaviour of the model matches that of the target (or subject) system.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationModelling Natural Action Selection
EditorsA. K. Seth, T. J. Prescott, J. J. Bryson
PublisherCambridge University Press
Pages427-453
Number of pages27
ISBN (Electronic)9780511731525
ISBN (Print)9781107000490
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2011

Fingerprint

Systems Analysis
Primates
Biological Science Disciplines
Social Behavior
Artificial Intelligence
Macaca
Social Theory
Communication

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Bryson, J. J., Ando, Y., & Lehmann, H. (2011). Agent-based models as scientific methodology: A case study analysing the DomWorld theory of primate social structure and female dominance. In A. K. Seth, T. J. Prescott, & J. J. Bryson (Eds.), Modelling Natural Action Selection (pp. 427-453). Cambridge University Press. https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511731525.024

Agent-based models as scientific methodology : A case study analysing the DomWorld theory of primate social structure and female dominance. / Bryson, Joanna J.; Ando, Yasushi; Lehmann, Hagen.

Modelling Natural Action Selection. ed. / A. K. Seth; T. J. Prescott; J. J. Bryson. Cambridge University Press, 2011. p. 427-453.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Bryson, JJ, Ando, Y & Lehmann, H 2011, Agent-based models as scientific methodology: A case study analysing the DomWorld theory of primate social structure and female dominance. in AK Seth, TJ Prescott & JJ Bryson (eds), Modelling Natural Action Selection. Cambridge University Press, pp. 427-453. https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511731525.024
Bryson JJ, Ando Y, Lehmann H. Agent-based models as scientific methodology: A case study analysing the DomWorld theory of primate social structure and female dominance. In Seth AK, Prescott TJ, Bryson JJ, editors, Modelling Natural Action Selection. Cambridge University Press. 2011. p. 427-453 https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511731525.024
Bryson, Joanna J. ; Ando, Yasushi ; Lehmann, Hagen. / Agent-based models as scientific methodology : A case study analysing the DomWorld theory of primate social structure and female dominance. Modelling Natural Action Selection. editor / A. K. Seth ; T. J. Prescott ; J. J. Bryson. Cambridge University Press, 2011. pp. 427-453
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