Age-related inhibition and learning effects: Evidence from transitive performance

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

In the absence of sufficient cognitive stimulation, intelligence — and with it, a capacity for learning new things — tends to degrade with age. In this paper I explore a novel hypothesis: that this may be an adaptive solution, since learning is facilitated by temporarily inhibiting action selection and thus introducing temporal delays. An older animal that is not being cognitively challenged may be in a sufficiently stable environment that reducing the delay before action at the cost of also reducing learning capacity may be a sensible tradeoff. I support parts of this model by matching a simulation of it to known reaction-time results, and by providing an account for previously unexplained task-learning results in adult and aged macaques.
LanguageEnglish
Pages3040-3045
Number of pages6
StatusPublished - 31 Jul 2009
EventThe 31st Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society (CogSci 2009) - Amsterdam
Duration: 29 Jul 20091 Aug 2009

Conference

ConferenceThe 31st Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society (CogSci 2009)
CityAmsterdam
Period29/07/091/08/09

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learning success
learning
performance
evidence
intelligence
animal
simulation

Cite this

Bryson, J. J. (2009). Age-related inhibition and learning effects: Evidence from transitive performance. 3040-3045. Paper presented at The 31st Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society (CogSci 2009), Amsterdam, .

Age-related inhibition and learning effects: Evidence from transitive performance. / Bryson, Joanna J.

2009. 3040-3045 Paper presented at The 31st Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society (CogSci 2009), Amsterdam, .

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Bryson, JJ 2009, 'Age-related inhibition and learning effects: Evidence from transitive performance' Paper presented at The 31st Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society (CogSci 2009), Amsterdam, 29/07/09 - 1/08/09, pp. 3040-3045.
Bryson JJ. Age-related inhibition and learning effects: Evidence from transitive performance. 2009. Paper presented at The 31st Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society (CogSci 2009), Amsterdam, .
Bryson, Joanna J. / Age-related inhibition and learning effects: Evidence from transitive performance. Paper presented at The 31st Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society (CogSci 2009), Amsterdam, .6 p.
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