After-school physical activity interventions on child and adolescent physical activity and health

a review of reviews

Yolanda Demetriou, Fiona Gillison, Thomas McKenzie

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Schools are a critical setting for children to accrue recommended levels of
physical activity, and after-school programmes are suggested to supplement
existing programmes such as physical education. This review of reviews provides
a comprehensive picture of the effects of after-school physical activity
programmes on student physical activity and health. We completed a literature
search of electronic databases and identified six existing systematic reviews
and meta-analyses of the effects of after-school programmes on child
and adolescent physical activity and health. We compared these reviews on
numerous factors, including the databases searched, aims, outcome variables,
physical activity measures, inclusion criteria, and quality of original studies.
Our review of reviews identified considerable differences among the published
reviews in the number and type of studies included, and in the conclusions
drawn. In general, the reviews identified better outcomes when conducting
the programmes in school rather than community settings, providing sessions
on two or more days a week, and ensuring high programme attendance rates.
Subgroup analyses indicated that girls were more receptive than boys to intervention
programmes that promoted weight control. Additionally, there
were some benefits for increasing physical activity levels among overweight
youth and boys. This review of reviews suggests there is currently only modest
support of the benefits of after-school programmes on child and adolescent
physical activity levels and body composition. Many questions remain unanswered,
and there is further need to design, implement, and assess quality
after-school interventions that target physical activity in diverse settings.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)191-215
JournalAdvances in Physical Education
Volume7
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 26 May 2017

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Exercise
Health
Databases
Physical Education and Training
Body Composition
Meta-Analysis
Students
Weights and Measures

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After-school physical activity interventions on child and adolescent physical activity and health : a review of reviews. / Demetriou, Yolanda; Gillison, Fiona; McKenzie, Thomas.

In: Advances in Physical Education, Vol. 7, No. 2, 26.05.2017, p. 191-215.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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