Adult cancers near high-voltage overhead power lines

P. Elliott, G. Shaddick, M. Douglass, K. De Hoogh, D.J. Briggs, M.B. Toledano

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: Extremely low-frequency magnetic fields are designated as possibly carcinogenic in humans, based on an epidemiologic association with childhood leukemia. Evidence for associations with adult cancers is weaker and inconsistent.

METHODS: We conducted a case-control study to investigate risks of adult cancers in relation to distance and extremely low-frequency magnetic fields from high-voltage overhead power lines using National Cancer Registry Data in England and Wales, 1974-2008. The study included 7823 leukemia, 6781 brain/central nervous system cancers, 9153 malignant melanoma, 29,202 female breast cancer cases, and 79,507 controls frequency-matched on year and region (three controls per case except for female breast cancer, one control per case) 15-74 years of age living within 1000 m of a high-voltage overhead power line.

RESULTS: There were no clear patterns of excess risk with distance from power lines. After adjustment for confounders (age, sex [except breast cancer], deprivation, rurality), for distances closest to the power lines (0-49 m) compared with distances 600-1000 m, odds ratios (ORs) ranged from 0.82 (95% confidence interval = 0.61-1.11; 66 cases) for malignant melanoma to 1.22 (0.88-1.69) for brain/central nervous system cancer. We observed no meaningful excess risks and no trends of risk with magnetic field strength for the four cancers examined. In adjusted analyses at the highest estimated field strength, ≥1000 nanotesla (nT), compared with <100 nT, ORs ranged from 0.68 (0.39-1.17) for malignant melanoma to 1.08 (0.77-1.51) for female breast cancer.

CONCLUSION: Our results do not support an epidemiologic association of adult cancers with residential magnetic fields in proximity to high-voltage overhead power lines
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)184-190
Number of pages7
JournalEpidemiology
Volume24
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2013

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Magnetic Fields
Neoplasms
Breast Neoplasms
Melanoma
Leukemia
Central Nervous System
Odds Ratio
Wales
Brain
England
Registries
Case-Control Studies
Confidence Intervals

Cite this

Elliott, P., Shaddick, G., Douglass, M., De Hoogh, K., Briggs, D. J., & Toledano, M. B. (2013). Adult cancers near high-voltage overhead power lines. Epidemiology, 24(2), 184-190. https://doi.org/10.1097/EDE.0b013e31827e95b9

Adult cancers near high-voltage overhead power lines. / Elliott, P.; Shaddick, G.; Douglass, M.; De Hoogh, K.; Briggs, D.J.; Toledano, M.B.

In: Epidemiology, Vol. 24, No. 2, 03.2013, p. 184-190.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Elliott, P, Shaddick, G, Douglass, M, De Hoogh, K, Briggs, DJ & Toledano, MB 2013, 'Adult cancers near high-voltage overhead power lines', Epidemiology, vol. 24, no. 2, pp. 184-190. https://doi.org/10.1097/EDE.0b013e31827e95b9
Elliott P, Shaddick G, Douglass M, De Hoogh K, Briggs DJ, Toledano MB. Adult cancers near high-voltage overhead power lines. Epidemiology. 2013 Mar;24(2):184-190. https://doi.org/10.1097/EDE.0b013e31827e95b9
Elliott, P. ; Shaddick, G. ; Douglass, M. ; De Hoogh, K. ; Briggs, D.J. ; Toledano, M.B. / Adult cancers near high-voltage overhead power lines. In: Epidemiology. 2013 ; Vol. 24, No. 2. pp. 184-190.
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N2 - BACKGROUND: Extremely low-frequency magnetic fields are designated as possibly carcinogenic in humans, based on an epidemiologic association with childhood leukemia. Evidence for associations with adult cancers is weaker and inconsistent. METHODS: We conducted a case-control study to investigate risks of adult cancers in relation to distance and extremely low-frequency magnetic fields from high-voltage overhead power lines using National Cancer Registry Data in England and Wales, 1974-2008. The study included 7823 leukemia, 6781 brain/central nervous system cancers, 9153 malignant melanoma, 29,202 female breast cancer cases, and 79,507 controls frequency-matched on year and region (three controls per case except for female breast cancer, one control per case) 15-74 years of age living within 1000 m of a high-voltage overhead power line. RESULTS: There were no clear patterns of excess risk with distance from power lines. After adjustment for confounders (age, sex [except breast cancer], deprivation, rurality), for distances closest to the power lines (0-49 m) compared with distances 600-1000 m, odds ratios (ORs) ranged from 0.82 (95% confidence interval = 0.61-1.11; 66 cases) for malignant melanoma to 1.22 (0.88-1.69) for brain/central nervous system cancer. We observed no meaningful excess risks and no trends of risk with magnetic field strength for the four cancers examined. In adjusted analyses at the highest estimated field strength, ≥1000 nanotesla (nT), compared with <100 nT, ORs ranged from 0.68 (0.39-1.17) for malignant melanoma to 1.08 (0.77-1.51) for female breast cancer. CONCLUSION: Our results do not support an epidemiologic association of adult cancers with residential magnetic fields in proximity to high-voltage overhead power lines

AB - BACKGROUND: Extremely low-frequency magnetic fields are designated as possibly carcinogenic in humans, based on an epidemiologic association with childhood leukemia. Evidence for associations with adult cancers is weaker and inconsistent. METHODS: We conducted a case-control study to investigate risks of adult cancers in relation to distance and extremely low-frequency magnetic fields from high-voltage overhead power lines using National Cancer Registry Data in England and Wales, 1974-2008. The study included 7823 leukemia, 6781 brain/central nervous system cancers, 9153 malignant melanoma, 29,202 female breast cancer cases, and 79,507 controls frequency-matched on year and region (three controls per case except for female breast cancer, one control per case) 15-74 years of age living within 1000 m of a high-voltage overhead power line. RESULTS: There were no clear patterns of excess risk with distance from power lines. After adjustment for confounders (age, sex [except breast cancer], deprivation, rurality), for distances closest to the power lines (0-49 m) compared with distances 600-1000 m, odds ratios (ORs) ranged from 0.82 (95% confidence interval = 0.61-1.11; 66 cases) for malignant melanoma to 1.22 (0.88-1.69) for brain/central nervous system cancer. We observed no meaningful excess risks and no trends of risk with magnetic field strength for the four cancers examined. In adjusted analyses at the highest estimated field strength, ≥1000 nanotesla (nT), compared with <100 nT, ORs ranged from 0.68 (0.39-1.17) for malignant melanoma to 1.08 (0.77-1.51) for female breast cancer. CONCLUSION: Our results do not support an epidemiologic association of adult cancers with residential magnetic fields in proximity to high-voltage overhead power lines

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