Adolescents with autism spectrum disorder show a circumspect reasoning bias rather than 'jumping-to-conclusions'

Mark Brosnan, Emma Chapman, Chris Ashwin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Citations (Scopus)
168 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

People with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) often take longer to make decisions. The Autism-Psychosis Model proposes that people with autism and psychosis show the opposite pattern of results on cognitive tasks. As those with psychosis show a jump-to-conclusions reasoning bias, those with ASD should show a circumspect reasoning bias. Jumping-to-conclusions was assessed in a sample of 20 adolescents with ASD and 23 age-matched controls using the jumping-to-conclusions beads task. Both groups demonstrated equivalent levels of confidence in decision-making, however the ASD group required more beads than controls before making their decision. Furthermore, there was a positive correlation between the beads required and degree of autism symptoms. Consistent with the Autism-Psychosis Model, a more circumspect reasoning bias was evident in ASD.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)513-520
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
Volume44
Issue number3
Early online date4 Sep 2013
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 2014

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