Adolescents with autism spectrum disorder show a circumspect reasoning bias rather than 'jumping-to-conclusions'

Mark Brosnan, Emma Chapman, Chris Ashwin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Citations (Scopus)
74 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

People with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) often take longer to make decisions. The Autism-Psychosis Model proposes that people with autism and psychosis show the opposite pattern of results on cognitive tasks. As those with psychosis show a jump-to-conclusions reasoning bias, those with ASD should show a circumspect reasoning bias. Jumping-to-conclusions was assessed in a sample of 20 adolescents with ASD and 23 age-matched controls using the jumping-to-conclusions beads task. Both groups demonstrated equivalent levels of confidence in decision-making, however the ASD group required more beads than controls before making their decision. Furthermore, there was a positive correlation between the beads required and degree of autism symptoms. Consistent with the Autism-Psychosis Model, a more circumspect reasoning bias was evident in ASD.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)513-520
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
Volume44
Issue number3
Early online date4 Sep 2013
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 2014

Fingerprint

Autistic Disorder
Psychotic Disorders
Decision Making
Autism Spectrum Disorder

Cite this

@article{413863f0a2ce4cc284affa183bbaf140,
title = "Adolescents with autism spectrum disorder show a circumspect reasoning bias rather than 'jumping-to-conclusions'",
abstract = "People with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) often take longer to make decisions. The Autism-Psychosis Model proposes that people with autism and psychosis show the opposite pattern of results on cognitive tasks. As those with psychosis show a jump-to-conclusions reasoning bias, those with ASD should show a circumspect reasoning bias. Jumping-to-conclusions was assessed in a sample of 20 adolescents with ASD and 23 age-matched controls using the jumping-to-conclusions beads task. Both groups demonstrated equivalent levels of confidence in decision-making, however the ASD group required more beads than controls before making their decision. Furthermore, there was a positive correlation between the beads required and degree of autism symptoms. Consistent with the Autism-Psychosis Model, a more circumspect reasoning bias was evident in ASD.",
author = "Mark Brosnan and Emma Chapman and Chris Ashwin",
year = "2014",
month = "3",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1007/s10803-013-1897-5",
language = "English",
volume = "44",
pages = "513--520",
journal = "Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders",
issn = "0162-3257",
publisher = "Springer New York",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Adolescents with autism spectrum disorder show a circumspect reasoning bias rather than 'jumping-to-conclusions'

AU - Brosnan, Mark

AU - Chapman, Emma

AU - Ashwin, Chris

PY - 2014/3/1

Y1 - 2014/3/1

N2 - People with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) often take longer to make decisions. The Autism-Psychosis Model proposes that people with autism and psychosis show the opposite pattern of results on cognitive tasks. As those with psychosis show a jump-to-conclusions reasoning bias, those with ASD should show a circumspect reasoning bias. Jumping-to-conclusions was assessed in a sample of 20 adolescents with ASD and 23 age-matched controls using the jumping-to-conclusions beads task. Both groups demonstrated equivalent levels of confidence in decision-making, however the ASD group required more beads than controls before making their decision. Furthermore, there was a positive correlation between the beads required and degree of autism symptoms. Consistent with the Autism-Psychosis Model, a more circumspect reasoning bias was evident in ASD.

AB - People with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) often take longer to make decisions. The Autism-Psychosis Model proposes that people with autism and psychosis show the opposite pattern of results on cognitive tasks. As those with psychosis show a jump-to-conclusions reasoning bias, those with ASD should show a circumspect reasoning bias. Jumping-to-conclusions was assessed in a sample of 20 adolescents with ASD and 23 age-matched controls using the jumping-to-conclusions beads task. Both groups demonstrated equivalent levels of confidence in decision-making, however the ASD group required more beads than controls before making their decision. Furthermore, there was a positive correlation between the beads required and degree of autism symptoms. Consistent with the Autism-Psychosis Model, a more circumspect reasoning bias was evident in ASD.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84894317772&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10803-013-1897-5

U2 - 10.1007/s10803-013-1897-5

DO - 10.1007/s10803-013-1897-5

M3 - Article

VL - 44

SP - 513

EP - 520

JO - Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

JF - Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

SN - 0162-3257

IS - 3

ER -