Adolescents' perceptions of their peers with Tourette's syndrome: An exploratory study

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstract

Abstract

Aim: The aim of the study was to understand how Tourette's syndrome (TS) is conceptualised by adolescents and explore how individuals with TS are perceived by their typically developing peers.
Method: Free text writing and focus groups were used to elicit the views of 22 year ten students from a secondary school in South East England. Grounded theory was used to develop an analytical framework concerning how school children conceptualise TS.
Results: Misconceptions and a lack of familiarity contributed to the participants experiencing conflicting emotions towards peers with TS. An anticipated sense of discomfort was accompanied by feelings of both pity and sympathy towards individuals who they viewed as transcending the boundaries of normalcy. The participants maintained that they would avoid initiating meaningful social relationships while holding feelings of social politeness or even protection towards those with TS.
Conclusions: The findings highlight the need and provide directions for developing tailor-made school-based educational interventions about TS targeting typically developing adolescents in order to promote social inclusion.
Original languageEnglish
Pages797
Number of pages1
Publication statusPublished - 14 Aug 2016
EventGlobal Partnerships: Enhancing Research, Policy and Practice: Global Partnerships: Enhancing Research, Policy and Practice - Melbourne, Australia
Duration: 14 Aug 201618 Aug 2016
Conference number: 15
http://wileyonlinelibrary.com/journal/jir

Conference

ConferenceGlobal Partnerships: Enhancing Research, Policy and Practice
CountryAustralia
CityMelbourne
Period14/08/1618/08/16
Internet address

Cite this

Forrester-Jones, R., & Malli, M. (2016). Adolescents' perceptions of their peers with Tourette's syndrome: An exploratory study. 797. Abstract from Global Partnerships: Enhancing Research, Policy and Practice, Melbourne, Australia.

Adolescents' perceptions of their peers with Tourette's syndrome: An exploratory study. / Forrester-Jones, Rachel; Malli, Melina.

2016. 797 Abstract from Global Partnerships: Enhancing Research, Policy and Practice, Melbourne, Australia.

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstract

Forrester-Jones, R & Malli, M 2016, 'Adolescents' perceptions of their peers with Tourette's syndrome: An exploratory study' Global Partnerships: Enhancing Research, Policy and Practice, Melbourne, Australia, 14/08/16 - 18/08/16, pp. 797.
Forrester-Jones R, Malli M. Adolescents' perceptions of their peers with Tourette's syndrome: An exploratory study. 2016. Abstract from Global Partnerships: Enhancing Research, Policy and Practice, Melbourne, Australia.
Forrester-Jones, Rachel ; Malli, Melina. / Adolescents' perceptions of their peers with Tourette's syndrome: An exploratory study. Abstract from Global Partnerships: Enhancing Research, Policy and Practice, Melbourne, Australia.1 p.
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