Adolescent and Parent Treatment Goals in an Internet-Delivered Chronic Pain Self-Management Program: Does Agreement of Treatment Goals Matter?

Emma Fisher, Maggie Bromberg, Gabrielle Tai, Tonya M Palermo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

12 Citations (SciVal)

Abstract

Objective To assess whether adolescent–parent agreement on treatment goals as part of an Internet-delivered cognitive-behavioral pain intervention was associated with adolescent outcomes. Methods 122 adolescent–parent dyads selected two treatment goals. Pain intensity and pain-related disability were assessed at pre-treatment, post-treatment, and 6- and 12-month follow-ups. We compared dyads who had goal agreement versus no agreement. Results 74 dyads (61%) agreed on one or more treatment goals, most commonly going to school, sports, and sleep. In dyads who chose the same goal, regardless of the content, adolescents had lower pain intensity post-treatment and at follow-up. When goals were categorized by domain, in dyads who agreed on physically active goals, adolescents were more likely to report lower pain intensity compared with other groups. Agreement of goals was not associated with changes in pain-related disability. Conclusions Agreement on treatment goals may be an important treatment process to maximize outcomes in self-management therapies.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)657
Number of pages666
JournalJournal of Pediatric Psychology
Volume42
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 30 Dec 2016

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Adolescent and Parent Treatment Goals in an Internet-Delivered Chronic Pain Self-Management Program: Does Agreement of Treatment Goals Matter?'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this