Adenine Enrichment at the Fourth CDS Residue in Bacterial Genes Is Consistent with Error Proofing for +1 Frameshifts

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Abstract

Beyond selection for optimal protein functioning, coding sequences (CDSs) are under selection at the RNA and DNA levels. Here, we identify a possible signature of "dual-coding," namely extensive adenine (A) enrichment at bacterial CDS fourth sites. In 99.07% of studied bacterial genomes, fourth site A use is greater than expected given genomic A-starting codon use. Arguing for nucleotide level selection, A-starting serine and arginine second codons are heavily utilized when compared with their non-A starting synonyms. Several models have the ability to explain some of this trend. In part, A-enrichment likely reduces 5' mRNA stability, promoting translation initiation. However T/U, which may also reduce stability, is avoided. Further, +1 frameshifts on the initiating ATG encode a stop codon (TGA) provided A is the fourth residue, acting either as a frameshift "catch and destroy" or a frameshift stop and adjust mechanism and hence implicated in translation initiation. Consistent with both, genomes lacking TGA stop codons exhibit weaker fourth site A-enrichment. Sequences lacking a Shine-Dalgarno sequence and those without upstream leader genes, that may be more error prone during initiation, have greater utilization of A, again suggesting a role in initiation. The frameshift correction model is consistent with the notion that many genomic features are error-mitigation factors and provides the first evidence for site-specific out of frame stop codon selection. We conjecture that the NTG universal start codon may have evolved as a consequence of TGA being a stop codon and the ability of NTGA to rapidly terminate or adjust a ribosome.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3064-3080
Number of pages17
JournalMolecular Biology and Evolution
Volume34
Issue number12
Early online date24 Aug 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2017

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Bacterial Genes
Terminator Codon
stop codon
Adenine
adenine
gene
codons
translation (genetics)
genomics
genes
genome
Codon
start codon
Bacterial Genomes
ribosomes
Initiator Codon
serine
arginine
RNA Stability
RNA

Keywords

  • Journal Article

Cite this

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title = "Adenine Enrichment at the Fourth CDS Residue in Bacterial Genes Is Consistent with Error Proofing for +1 Frameshifts",
abstract = "Beyond selection for optimal protein functioning, coding sequences (CDSs) are under selection at the RNA and DNA levels. Here, we identify a possible signature of {"}dual-coding,{"} namely extensive adenine (A) enrichment at bacterial CDS fourth sites. In 99.07{\%} of studied bacterial genomes, fourth site A use is greater than expected given genomic A-starting codon use. Arguing for nucleotide level selection, A-starting serine and arginine second codons are heavily utilized when compared with their non-A starting synonyms. Several models have the ability to explain some of this trend. In part, A-enrichment likely reduces 5' mRNA stability, promoting translation initiation. However T/U, which may also reduce stability, is avoided. Further, +1 frameshifts on the initiating ATG encode a stop codon (TGA) provided A is the fourth residue, acting either as a frameshift {"}catch and destroy{"} or a frameshift stop and adjust mechanism and hence implicated in translation initiation. Consistent with both, genomes lacking TGA stop codons exhibit weaker fourth site A-enrichment. Sequences lacking a Shine-Dalgarno sequence and those without upstream leader genes, that may be more error prone during initiation, have greater utilization of A, again suggesting a role in initiation. The frameshift correction model is consistent with the notion that many genomic features are error-mitigation factors and provides the first evidence for site-specific out of frame stop codon selection. We conjecture that the NTG universal start codon may have evolved as a consequence of TGA being a stop codon and the ability of NTGA to rapidly terminate or adjust a ribosome.",
keywords = "Journal Article",
author = "Liam Abrahams and Hurst, {Laurence D}",
note = "{\circledC} The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.",
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T1 - Adenine Enrichment at the Fourth CDS Residue in Bacterial Genes Is Consistent with Error Proofing for +1 Frameshifts

AU - Abrahams, Liam

AU - Hurst, Laurence D

N1 - © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

PY - 2017/12/1

Y1 - 2017/12/1

N2 - Beyond selection for optimal protein functioning, coding sequences (CDSs) are under selection at the RNA and DNA levels. Here, we identify a possible signature of "dual-coding," namely extensive adenine (A) enrichment at bacterial CDS fourth sites. In 99.07% of studied bacterial genomes, fourth site A use is greater than expected given genomic A-starting codon use. Arguing for nucleotide level selection, A-starting serine and arginine second codons are heavily utilized when compared with their non-A starting synonyms. Several models have the ability to explain some of this trend. In part, A-enrichment likely reduces 5' mRNA stability, promoting translation initiation. However T/U, which may also reduce stability, is avoided. Further, +1 frameshifts on the initiating ATG encode a stop codon (TGA) provided A is the fourth residue, acting either as a frameshift "catch and destroy" or a frameshift stop and adjust mechanism and hence implicated in translation initiation. Consistent with both, genomes lacking TGA stop codons exhibit weaker fourth site A-enrichment. Sequences lacking a Shine-Dalgarno sequence and those without upstream leader genes, that may be more error prone during initiation, have greater utilization of A, again suggesting a role in initiation. The frameshift correction model is consistent with the notion that many genomic features are error-mitigation factors and provides the first evidence for site-specific out of frame stop codon selection. We conjecture that the NTG universal start codon may have evolved as a consequence of TGA being a stop codon and the ability of NTGA to rapidly terminate or adjust a ribosome.

AB - Beyond selection for optimal protein functioning, coding sequences (CDSs) are under selection at the RNA and DNA levels. Here, we identify a possible signature of "dual-coding," namely extensive adenine (A) enrichment at bacterial CDS fourth sites. In 99.07% of studied bacterial genomes, fourth site A use is greater than expected given genomic A-starting codon use. Arguing for nucleotide level selection, A-starting serine and arginine second codons are heavily utilized when compared with their non-A starting synonyms. Several models have the ability to explain some of this trend. In part, A-enrichment likely reduces 5' mRNA stability, promoting translation initiation. However T/U, which may also reduce stability, is avoided. Further, +1 frameshifts on the initiating ATG encode a stop codon (TGA) provided A is the fourth residue, acting either as a frameshift "catch and destroy" or a frameshift stop and adjust mechanism and hence implicated in translation initiation. Consistent with both, genomes lacking TGA stop codons exhibit weaker fourth site A-enrichment. Sequences lacking a Shine-Dalgarno sequence and those without upstream leader genes, that may be more error prone during initiation, have greater utilization of A, again suggesting a role in initiation. The frameshift correction model is consistent with the notion that many genomic features are error-mitigation factors and provides the first evidence for site-specific out of frame stop codon selection. We conjecture that the NTG universal start codon may have evolved as a consequence of TGA being a stop codon and the ability of NTGA to rapidly terminate or adjust a ribosome.

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