Acceptance of the unpleasant reality of chronic pain: effects upon attention to pain and engagement with daily activities

I Viane, G Crombez, C Eccleston, J Devulder, W De Corte

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

91 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper investigates whether acceptance was related to less attention to pain, and to more engagement with daily activities. The results of two studies are reported. In a first cross-sectional study, 501 chronic pain patients completed self-report instruments on pain severity, attention to pain and acceptance. In a second diary study, 62 patients with chronic pain reported pain intensity, attention to pain and characteristics of goal-directed behaviour 8 times a day using an experience sampling method. Acceptance was measured using a self-report instrument. It was found that acceptance was related to less attention to pain (study 1 and study 2), more engagement with daily activities, a higher motivation to complete activities and a better efficacy to perform daily activities (study 2). Results are discussed in terms of how a positive life despite pain may be preserved by a flexible adjustment of personal goals to current limitations and adversities.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)282-288
Number of pages7
JournalPain
Volume112
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2004

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