A systematic review and meta-analysis of lifestyle and body mass index predictors of successful assisted reproductive technologies

Satvinder Purewal, Sarah Chapman, Olga Van Den Akker

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

1 Citation (Scopus)
17 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Objective: Lifestyle (smoking, drinking alcohol) and body mass index (BMI) predictors of successful outcomes in assisted reproductive technology (ART) treatments were examined in this meta-analysis. Method: A bibliographic search was undertaken using six databases. The review was informed by PRISMA/MOOSE guidelines. Meta-analytic data were analysed using random effects models. Results: We included 77 studies examining effects of BMI, smoking and drinking alcohol. Patients with a BMI< =24.9 were significantly more likely to achieve LB/pregnancy than with BMI> =25 OR = 1.219 (95% CI:1.128–1.319, z = 4.971, p <.001; I 2 = 53.779%, p =.001). Non-smokers were significantly more likely to achieve a LB or pregnancy than smokers OR = 1.457 (95% CI:1.228–1.727, z = 4.324, p <.001; I 2 = 51.883; p =.001). Meta-regression revealed the number of embryos transferred significantly moderated the effects of smoking on ART outcomes, and there was a trend indicating primary infertility and high BMI were also significant moderators. The evidence for drinking alcohol was inconclusive due to the small number of studies. Conclusions: This meta-analysis confirms that ART treatment success can be predicted with lifestyle factors. Further, non-smokers’ relative odds of pregnancy/live birth increase as more embryos were transferred but there was a trend that the odds of pregnancy/live birth decrease with primary infertility and high BMI.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2-18
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of Psychosomatic Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume40
Issue number1
Early online date27 Nov 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019

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Assisted Reproductive Techniques
Meta-Analysis
Life Style
Body Mass Index
Alcohol Drinking
Pregnancy
Smoking
Live Birth
Infertility
Embryonic Structures
Odds Ratio
Databases
Guidelines
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • IVF
  • Infertility
  • assisted reproductive technologies
  • women’s health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Reproductive Medicine
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Obstetrics and Gynaecology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

A systematic review and meta-analysis of lifestyle and body mass index predictors of successful assisted reproductive technologies. / Purewal, Satvinder; Chapman, Sarah; Van Den Akker, Olga.

In: Journal of Psychosomatic Obstetrics and Gynecology, Vol. 40, No. 1, 2019, p. 2-18.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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