Abstract

Purpose: The acute effects of a single bout of upper-body exercise on postprandial metabolism in persons with spinal cord injury is currently not well understood. The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of a single bout of upper-body high-intensity interval exercise (HIIE) and moderate-intensity continuous exercise (MICE), in comparison to a no-exercise control (REST) condition on postprandial metabolic responses in persons with chronic paraplegia.
Methods: 10 participants (eight males, two females, age: 49 ± 10 yrs, time since injury: 22 ± 13 yrs) with chronic paraplegia took part in a randomised cross-over study, consisting of three trials: HIIE (8 x 60 s at 70% peak power output (PPEAK)), MICE (25 min at 45% PPEAK), and REST, at least 3 days apart. Exercise was performed in the fasted state, and participants consumed a mixed-macronutrient liquid meal 1-h post-exercise. Venous blood and expired gas samples were collected at regular intervals for 6-h post-meal consumption.
Results: There were no significant differences in postprandial iAUC for triglycerides (p=0.59) or glucose (p=0.56) between conditions. Insulin iAUC tended to be lower following MICE (135 ± 85 nmol/L· 360 min-1) compared to REST (162 ± 93 nmol/L · 360 min-1), but this did not reach statistical significance (P=0.06, d=0.30). Participants reported a greater fondness (P=0.04) and preference for HIIE over MICE.
Conclusions: Following an overnight fast, a single bout of upper-body exercise before eating, has no effect on postprandial metabolism in persons with chronic paraplegia, irrespective of exercise intensity. This suggests that alternative exercise strategies may be required to stimulate postprandial substrate oxidation for this population.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages26
JournalMedicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
Publication statusAcceptance date - 23 Oct 2020

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