A preliminary evaluation of integrated treatment for co-existing substance use and severe mental health problems: impact on teams and service users

Emma Griffith, Hermine Graham, Alex Copello, Max Birchwood, Jim Orford, Dermot McGovern, Kim T. Mueser, Ruth Clutterbuck

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

AIM: This study sought to develop a methodology to measure the integration of substance use treatment within five existing assertive outreach (AO) teams in Birmingham, UK. Changes in the way teams approach and discuss drug and alcohol problems amongst clients with severe mental health problems
were anticipated. This was assessed at team meetings, through clinical sessions and case notes. The impact of change in team practice was also measured at the level of service users by assessing psychiatric symptoms, engagement, amount of substance used and conviction ratings of positive
substance-related beliefs. METHOD: Each team was provided with training and supervision to deliver cognitive behavioural
integrated treatment (C-BIT). This aimed to increase awareness of the relationship between psychosis and problem substance use and provide skills to manage these difficulties. Data was collected at intervals over a 36 month period. RESULTS: Staff within teams increased in self reported confidence and skills to deliver C-BIT and these gains were maintained over time. Findings suggest that following training, integration was achieved to a degree and changes in teams practice were observed. Improvements in client engagement and reduction in alcohol intake and positive alcohol-related beliefs were also noted but occurred regardless
of team training. CONCLUSIONS: Training and supporting AO staff to use an integrated treatment approach is well received
and produces lasting changes in confidence and practice. Whether this can go on to impact upon client outcome is yet to be established
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 2007
EventBritish Association for Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapies (BABCP) 35th Annual Conference and Workshops, 2007 - Brighton, UK United Kingdom
Duration: 12 Sep 200714 Sep 2007

Conference

ConferenceBritish Association for Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapies (BABCP) 35th Annual Conference and Workshops, 2007
CountryUK United Kingdom
CityBrighton
Period12/09/0714/09/07

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Mental Health
Alcohols
Psychotic Disorders
Psychiatry
Pharmaceutical Preparations

Cite this

Griffith, E., Graham, H., Copello, A., Birchwood, M., Orford, J., McGovern, D., ... Clutterbuck, R. (2007). A preliminary evaluation of integrated treatment for co-existing substance use and severe mental health problems: impact on teams and service users. Paper presented at British Association for Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapies (BABCP) 35th Annual Conference and Workshops, 2007, Brighton, UK United Kingdom.

A preliminary evaluation of integrated treatment for co-existing substance use and severe mental health problems: impact on teams and service users. / Griffith, Emma; Graham, Hermine; Copello, Alex; Birchwood, Max; Orford, Jim; McGovern, Dermot; Mueser, Kim T.; Clutterbuck, Ruth.

2007. Paper presented at British Association for Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapies (BABCP) 35th Annual Conference and Workshops, 2007, Brighton, UK United Kingdom.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Griffith, E, Graham, H, Copello, A, Birchwood, M, Orford, J, McGovern, D, Mueser, KT & Clutterbuck, R 2007, 'A preliminary evaluation of integrated treatment for co-existing substance use and severe mental health problems: impact on teams and service users' Paper presented at British Association for Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapies (BABCP) 35th Annual Conference and Workshops, 2007, Brighton, UK United Kingdom, 12/09/07 - 14/09/07, .
Griffith E, Graham H, Copello A, Birchwood M, Orford J, McGovern D et al. A preliminary evaluation of integrated treatment for co-existing substance use and severe mental health problems: impact on teams and service users. 2007. Paper presented at British Association for Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapies (BABCP) 35th Annual Conference and Workshops, 2007, Brighton, UK United Kingdom.
Griffith, Emma ; Graham, Hermine ; Copello, Alex ; Birchwood, Max ; Orford, Jim ; McGovern, Dermot ; Mueser, Kim T. ; Clutterbuck, Ruth. / A preliminary evaluation of integrated treatment for co-existing substance use and severe mental health problems: impact on teams and service users. Paper presented at British Association for Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapies (BABCP) 35th Annual Conference and Workshops, 2007, Brighton, UK United Kingdom.
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