A narrative approach to strategy-as-practice

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The strategy-as-practice project would benefit from greater consideration of narratological concerns. Narratorship, the formulation and performance of narratives, is an important strategy practice; narratives (stories) are key tools of strategists; and narratological perspectives generally may usefully inform strategy research, leading to less scientistic and more reflexive scholarship. Five specific ways in which attention to narratology can assist the strategy-as-practice agenda are considered: humanising strategy research, dealing with equivocality, accounting adequately for polyphony, understanding outcomes, and sensitivity to issues of power. While storytelling approaches have considerable strengths, they also have limitations, and are offered as a supplement to, not replacement of, existing perspectives.
LanguageEnglish
Pages1143-1167
Number of pages25
JournalBusiness History
Volume55
Issue number7
DOIs
StatusPublished - Oct 2013

Fingerprint

Strategy as practice
Strategy research
Research Strategy
Polyphony
Agenda
Equivocality
Storytelling
Replacement
Narratology
Supplements

Cite this

A narrative approach to strategy-as-practice. / Brown, A. D.; Thompson, E. R.

In: Business History, Vol. 55, No. 7, 10.2013, p. 1143-1167.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{ba9206f875e143f9bfa98d48b10fce7f,
title = "A narrative approach to strategy-as-practice",
abstract = "The strategy-as-practice project would benefit from greater consideration of narratological concerns. Narratorship, the formulation and performance of narratives, is an important strategy practice; narratives (stories) are key tools of strategists; and narratological perspectives generally may usefully inform strategy research, leading to less scientistic and more reflexive scholarship. Five specific ways in which attention to narratology can assist the strategy-as-practice agenda are considered: humanising strategy research, dealing with equivocality, accounting adequately for polyphony, understanding outcomes, and sensitivity to issues of power. While storytelling approaches have considerable strengths, they also have limitations, and are offered as a supplement to, not replacement of, existing perspectives.",
author = "Brown, {A. D.} and Thompson, {E. R.}",
year = "2013",
month = "10",
doi = "10.1080/00076791.2013.838031",
language = "English",
volume = "55",
pages = "1143--1167",
journal = "Business History",
issn = "0007-6791",
publisher = "Taylor and Francis",
number = "7",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - A narrative approach to strategy-as-practice

AU - Brown, A. D.

AU - Thompson, E. R.

PY - 2013/10

Y1 - 2013/10

N2 - The strategy-as-practice project would benefit from greater consideration of narratological concerns. Narratorship, the formulation and performance of narratives, is an important strategy practice; narratives (stories) are key tools of strategists; and narratological perspectives generally may usefully inform strategy research, leading to less scientistic and more reflexive scholarship. Five specific ways in which attention to narratology can assist the strategy-as-practice agenda are considered: humanising strategy research, dealing with equivocality, accounting adequately for polyphony, understanding outcomes, and sensitivity to issues of power. While storytelling approaches have considerable strengths, they also have limitations, and are offered as a supplement to, not replacement of, existing perspectives.

AB - The strategy-as-practice project would benefit from greater consideration of narratological concerns. Narratorship, the formulation and performance of narratives, is an important strategy practice; narratives (stories) are key tools of strategists; and narratological perspectives generally may usefully inform strategy research, leading to less scientistic and more reflexive scholarship. Five specific ways in which attention to narratology can assist the strategy-as-practice agenda are considered: humanising strategy research, dealing with equivocality, accounting adequately for polyphony, understanding outcomes, and sensitivity to issues of power. While storytelling approaches have considerable strengths, they also have limitations, and are offered as a supplement to, not replacement of, existing perspectives.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84886388211&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00076791.2013.838031

U2 - 10.1080/00076791.2013.838031

DO - 10.1080/00076791.2013.838031

M3 - Article

VL - 55

SP - 1143

EP - 1167

JO - Business History

T2 - Business History

JF - Business History

SN - 0007-6791

IS - 7

ER -