A FACS validated 3D human facial model

Darren Cosker, Eva Krumhuber, Adrian Hilton

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

The Facial Action Coding System (FACS) [Ekman et al. 2002] has become a popular reference for creating fully controllable facial models that allow the manipulation of single actions or so-called Action Units (AUs). For example, realistic 3D models based on FACS have been used for investigating the perceptual effects of moving faces, and for character expression mapping in recent movies. However, since none of the facial actions (AUs) in these models are validated by FACS experts it is unclear how valid the model would be in situations where the accurate production of an AU is essential [Krumhuber and Tamarit 2010]. Moreover, previous work has employed motion capture data representing only sparse 3D facial positions which does not include dense surface deformation detail.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationFAA '10 Proceedings of the ACM/SSPNET 2nd International Symposium on Facial Analysis and Animation
Place of PublicationNew York
PublisherAssociation for Computing Machinery
ISBN (Print)9781450303880
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010
EventACM/SSPNET 2nd International Symposium on Facial Analysis and Animation, FAA 2010, October 21, 2010 - October 21, 2010 - Edinburgh, UK United Kingdom
Duration: 1 Jan 2010 → …

Publication series

NameACM International Conference Proceeding Series
PublisherAssociation for Computing Machinery

Conference

ConferenceACM/SSPNET 2nd International Symposium on Facial Analysis and Animation, FAA 2010, October 21, 2010 - October 21, 2010
CountryUK United Kingdom
CityEdinburgh
Period1/01/10 → …

Fingerprint

Expert systems
Data acquisition

Cite this

Cosker, D., Krumhuber, E., & Hilton, A. (2010). A FACS validated 3D human facial model. In FAA '10 Proceedings of the ACM/SSPNET 2nd International Symposium on Facial Analysis and Animation (ACM International Conference Proceeding Series). New York: Association for Computing Machinery. https://doi.org/10.1145/1924035.1924039

A FACS validated 3D human facial model. / Cosker, Darren; Krumhuber, Eva; Hilton, Adrian.

FAA '10 Proceedings of the ACM/SSPNET 2nd International Symposium on Facial Analysis and Animation. New York : Association for Computing Machinery, 2010. (ACM International Conference Proceeding Series).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Cosker, D, Krumhuber, E & Hilton, A 2010, A FACS validated 3D human facial model. in FAA '10 Proceedings of the ACM/SSPNET 2nd International Symposium on Facial Analysis and Animation. ACM International Conference Proceeding Series, Association for Computing Machinery, New York, ACM/SSPNET 2nd International Symposium on Facial Analysis and Animation, FAA 2010, October 21, 2010 - October 21, 2010, Edinburgh, UK United Kingdom, 1/01/10. https://doi.org/10.1145/1924035.1924039
Cosker D, Krumhuber E, Hilton A. A FACS validated 3D human facial model. In FAA '10 Proceedings of the ACM/SSPNET 2nd International Symposium on Facial Analysis and Animation. New York: Association for Computing Machinery. 2010. (ACM International Conference Proceeding Series). https://doi.org/10.1145/1924035.1924039
Cosker, Darren ; Krumhuber, Eva ; Hilton, Adrian. / A FACS validated 3D human facial model. FAA '10 Proceedings of the ACM/SSPNET 2nd International Symposium on Facial Analysis and Animation. New York : Association for Computing Machinery, 2010. (ACM International Conference Proceeding Series).
@inbook{3106dc40cfca4d8e8ac3a6308e8dbb83,
title = "A FACS validated 3D human facial model",
abstract = "The Facial Action Coding System (FACS) [Ekman et al. 2002] has become a popular reference for creating fully controllable facial models that allow the manipulation of single actions or so-called Action Units (AUs). For example, realistic 3D models based on FACS have been used for investigating the perceptual effects of moving faces, and for character expression mapping in recent movies. However, since none of the facial actions (AUs) in these models are validated by FACS experts it is unclear how valid the model would be in situations where the accurate production of an AU is essential [Krumhuber and Tamarit 2010]. Moreover, previous work has employed motion capture data representing only sparse 3D facial positions which does not include dense surface deformation detail.",
author = "Darren Cosker and Eva Krumhuber and Adrian Hilton",
note = "ACM/SSPNET 2nd International Symposium on Facial Analysis and Animation, FAA 2010. 21 October 2010. Edinburgh, UK.",
year = "2010",
doi = "10.1145/1924035.1924039",
language = "English",
isbn = "9781450303880",
series = "ACM International Conference Proceeding Series",
publisher = "Association for Computing Machinery",
booktitle = "FAA '10 Proceedings of the ACM/SSPNET 2nd International Symposium on Facial Analysis and Animation",
address = "USA United States",

}

TY - CHAP

T1 - A FACS validated 3D human facial model

AU - Cosker, Darren

AU - Krumhuber, Eva

AU - Hilton, Adrian

N1 - ACM/SSPNET 2nd International Symposium on Facial Analysis and Animation, FAA 2010. 21 October 2010. Edinburgh, UK.

PY - 2010

Y1 - 2010

N2 - The Facial Action Coding System (FACS) [Ekman et al. 2002] has become a popular reference for creating fully controllable facial models that allow the manipulation of single actions or so-called Action Units (AUs). For example, realistic 3D models based on FACS have been used for investigating the perceptual effects of moving faces, and for character expression mapping in recent movies. However, since none of the facial actions (AUs) in these models are validated by FACS experts it is unclear how valid the model would be in situations where the accurate production of an AU is essential [Krumhuber and Tamarit 2010]. Moreover, previous work has employed motion capture data representing only sparse 3D facial positions which does not include dense surface deformation detail.

AB - The Facial Action Coding System (FACS) [Ekman et al. 2002] has become a popular reference for creating fully controllable facial models that allow the manipulation of single actions or so-called Action Units (AUs). For example, realistic 3D models based on FACS have been used for investigating the perceptual effects of moving faces, and for character expression mapping in recent movies. However, since none of the facial actions (AUs) in these models are validated by FACS experts it is unclear how valid the model would be in situations where the accurate production of an AU is essential [Krumhuber and Tamarit 2010]. Moreover, previous work has employed motion capture data representing only sparse 3D facial positions which does not include dense surface deformation detail.

UR - http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/1924035.1924039

U2 - 10.1145/1924035.1924039

DO - 10.1145/1924035.1924039

M3 - Chapter

SN - 9781450303880

T3 - ACM International Conference Proceeding Series

BT - FAA '10 Proceedings of the ACM/SSPNET 2nd International Symposium on Facial Analysis and Animation

PB - Association for Computing Machinery

CY - New York

ER -