A distributed neural signal sensor system

Christopher Clarke, John Taylor, Robert Rieger, Nick Donaldson

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

  • 2 Citations

Abstract

In this paper the design of an implantable neural signal sensing system is described. The system is distributed with in the patient's body to allow a very low mass neural signal sensor to be placed at the optimum site for sensing with control of the sensor and external interfacing for power and data transmission in the abdominal cavity, where more space is available. A digital communication strategy between the two parts of the system is described, and shown to operate effectively over an implantable cable.

Conference

ConferenceIEEE International Symposium on Circuits and Systems (ISCAS 2005)
CountryJapan
CityKobe
Period23/05/0526/05/05

Fingerprint

Sensors
Power transmission
Data communication systems
Cables
Communication

Cite this

Clarke, C., Taylor, J., Rieger, R., & Donaldson, N. (2005). A distributed neural signal sensor system. 145-148. Paper presented at IEEE International Symposium on Circuits and Systems (ISCAS 2005), Kobe, Japan.DOI: 10.1109/ISCAS.2005.1464545

A distributed neural signal sensor system. / Clarke, Christopher; Taylor, John; Rieger, Robert; Donaldson, Nick.

2005. 145-148 Paper presented at IEEE International Symposium on Circuits and Systems (ISCAS 2005), Kobe, Japan.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Clarke, C, Taylor, J, Rieger, R & Donaldson, N 2005, 'A distributed neural signal sensor system' Paper presented at IEEE International Symposium on Circuits and Systems (ISCAS 2005), Kobe, Japan, 23/05/05 - 26/05/05, pp. 145-148. DOI: 10.1109/ISCAS.2005.1464545
Clarke C, Taylor J, Rieger R, Donaldson N. A distributed neural signal sensor system. 2005. Paper presented at IEEE International Symposium on Circuits and Systems (ISCAS 2005), Kobe, Japan. Available from, DOI: 10.1109/ISCAS.2005.1464545
Clarke, Christopher ; Taylor, John ; Rieger, Robert ; Donaldson, Nick. / A distributed neural signal sensor system. Paper presented at IEEE International Symposium on Circuits and Systems (ISCAS 2005), Kobe, Japan.
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