A case study of stride frequency and swing time in elite able-bodied sprint running: implications for amputee debate

I N Bezodis, Aki Salo, D G Kerwin, Sarah Churchill, Grant Trewartha

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Recent research into trans-tibial double-amputee sprint performance has debated the possible inherent advantages, disadvantages and limitations to sprinting with prosthetic limbs compared to healthy limbs. Biomechanical data athered throughout a training season from an elite able-bodied sprinter provide a new perspective on this debate. Peak stride frequency was measured at 2.62 Hz, and the orresponding swing time was estimated to be 0.287 s in the able-bodied sprinter. Published swing time and stride frequency values from the double-amputee at maximum elocity, thought to be beyond biological limits, therefore may not be so, although previously published research has provided evidence that some joint kinetic values from the double-amputee have not been shown in elite able-bodied sprinting.
LanguageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the XXVIII International Conference on Biomechanics in Sports (2010)
EditorsR Jensen, W Ebben, E Petushek, C Richter, K Roemer
Place of PublicationMarquette, U. S. A.
PublisherNorthern Michigan University
Pages131-133
Number of pages3
StatusPublished - Jul 2010

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Amputees
Research
Extremities
Joints

Cite this

Bezodis, I. N., Salo, A., Kerwin, D. G., Churchill, S., & Trewartha, G. (2010). A case study of stride frequency and swing time in elite able-bodied sprint running: implications for amputee debate. In R. Jensen, W. Ebben, E. Petushek, C. Richter, & K. Roemer (Eds.), Proceedings of the XXVIII International Conference on Biomechanics in Sports (2010) (pp. 131-133). Marquette, U. S. A.: Northern Michigan University.

A case study of stride frequency and swing time in elite able-bodied sprint running: implications for amputee debate. / Bezodis, I N; Salo, Aki; Kerwin, D G; Churchill, Sarah; Trewartha, Grant.

Proceedings of the XXVIII International Conference on Biomechanics in Sports (2010). ed. / R Jensen; W Ebben; E Petushek; C Richter; K Roemer. Marquette, U. S. A. : Northern Michigan University, 2010. p. 131-133.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Bezodis, IN, Salo, A, Kerwin, DG, Churchill, S & Trewartha, G 2010, A case study of stride frequency and swing time in elite able-bodied sprint running: implications for amputee debate. in R Jensen, W Ebben, E Petushek, C Richter & K Roemer (eds), Proceedings of the XXVIII International Conference on Biomechanics in Sports (2010). Northern Michigan University, Marquette, U. S. A., pp. 131-133.
Bezodis IN, Salo A, Kerwin DG, Churchill S, Trewartha G. A case study of stride frequency and swing time in elite able-bodied sprint running: implications for amputee debate. In Jensen R, Ebben W, Petushek E, Richter C, Roemer K, editors, Proceedings of the XXVIII International Conference on Biomechanics in Sports (2010). Marquette, U. S. A.: Northern Michigan University. 2010. p. 131-133.
Bezodis, I N ; Salo, Aki ; Kerwin, D G ; Churchill, Sarah ; Trewartha, Grant. / A case study of stride frequency and swing time in elite able-bodied sprint running: implications for amputee debate. Proceedings of the XXVIII International Conference on Biomechanics in Sports (2010). editor / R Jensen ; W Ebben ; E Petushek ; C Richter ; K Roemer. Marquette, U. S. A. : Northern Michigan University, 2010. pp. 131-133
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