Building Resilience to the Impacts of Resource Corridor Development in Sub-Saharan Africa

  • Maconachie, Roy (PI)
  • Odee, David (CoI)
  • Hobbs, Jonathan (CoI)
  • Kimomo, Shadrack (CoI)
  • Bangura, Kabba (CoI)
  • Anderson, Kevin (CoI)
  • Bangura, Peter (CoI)
  • Hobbs, Jonathan (CoI)
  • Ichang'i, Daniel (CoI)
  • Gbondo, Daniel (CoI)
  • Mattia, Cecilia (CoI)
  • Lempa, Kristan (CoI)
  • Barnfather, Nicola (CoI)
  • Goodenough, Kathryn (CoI)
  • Watt, Allan (CoI)
  • Stevens, Paul (CoI)
  • Perchard, Andrew (CoI)
  • Hilson, Gavin (CoI)

Project: Research-related funding

Project Details

Description

Pathway to the GCRF Call 2016-17

Layman's description

In Africa, the inability to unlock natural resource wealth for the benefit of poor populations—a phenomenon popularly known as the “resource curse”—has spawned extensive debate among researchers and policymakers in recent years. If managed sustainably, resource wealth could yield significant revenue and enhance infrastructure, which, in some of Africa’s poorest countries, would catalyse marked improvement in the quality of life of inhabitants. But while mining reforms and international extractive industry investments have generated rents and helped some African countries achieve phenomenal economic growth, the benefits have been uneven, and have often had enormous social, political, and economic consequences.

Proponents of extractive-led development in Africa have argued that coordinated infrastructure development within and between countries can provide an “anchor point” for sustainable resource extraction, while presenting an opportunity to stimulate zones of new economic activity along “resource corridors”. These corridors involve coordination between roads, railways, pipelines, ports and power lines, in the process catalysing and delivering economic opportunities and sustainable development. But they can also pose threats to environmental, social, political and economic systems. As the challenges associated with resource corridor development are so multi-faceted and In Africa, the inability to unlock natural resource wealth for the benefit of poor populations—a phenomenon popularly known as the “resource curse”—has spawned extensive debate among researchers and policymakers in recent years. If managed sustainably, resource wealth could yield significant revenue and enhance infrastructure, which, in some of Africa’s poorest countries, would catalyse marked improvement in the quality of life of inhabitants. But while mining reforms and international extractive industry investments have generated rents and helped some African countries achieve phenomenal economic growth, the benefits have been uneven, and have often had enormous social, political, and economic consequences.

The proposed project will create a new interdisciplinary network of researchers and practitioners from the UK and two key countries in sub-Saharan Africa (Kenya and Sierra Leone), whose research focuses on the challenges of resource corridor development and associated implications for sustainable development. Through desk-based research and a 2-day workshop in Nairobi, the proposed project will engage a diverse range of key stakeholders, build new understanding of resource corridor development, and explore how the negative impacts can be minimised through better planning and policy. In doing so, the project will establish new sustainable relationships between all project partners by building an academic collaboration with valuable policy implications for sustainable natural resource management and development.
Short title£19,400
StatusFinished
Effective start/end date1/03/171/03/18